"What equipment should a wedding photographer have?"

January 16, 2013  •  Leave a Comment

 

"What equipment should a wedding photographer have?"

          I don't want to start a clinic for photographers here. (you can get that here) Many pros I know buy pretty much every updated iteration of the Canon or Nikon camera system that is released. Undoubtedly, they stay on the cutting edge of technology and can push their gear to greater limits to capture an image in extreme darkness or other difficult conditions. I know other pros that either feel that the top end gear they have (and replace every few years or so) does a perfectly good job without buying up every single new model before the old one has hardly gotten the plastic off the LCD. Others still feel that they shoot far too much and wear out their gear too often to use top level gear. They feel they can capture exceptional images regardless and use cheaper gear that is closer to being "disposable."
 
          I can't say that any of them are wrong but I do want to deflect some attention away from the equipment in general. A camera does not make a photographer any more than an oven makes a cook or a pen makes an author. Every shooter at any skill level is always, at some point, somewhere along a curve where they have to ask themselves if their ability level is limiting what their camera can do or if their camera is limiting what THEY are able to do. If you do your homework, photography equipment is clearly divided (by price, build quality and usually by the very model name) into Amateur, Serious-Enthusiast and Professional gear.  If you expect a true professional, then you should expect them to have gear that is not going to limit their ability. Aside from cameras and lenses, a good wedding photographer should be familiar with using flash, on and off their camera, as well as various modifiers that shape and control the light to suit their task. In order to handle all the possible situations that may arise, they need to have all these different tools at hand and in working order so shots will not be missed because the conditions were not optimal for available (natural) light-only photographs. EVERY photographer should make use of shooting in RAW format (another discussion) for the enormous benefits in the editing suite. Since RAW files are massive, your photographer should be prepared with enough memory card storage to shoot 1,000-3,000 images which, depending on the camera, can be 16-80GB. Personally, I bring 96GB to every wedding.
 
 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 


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