Brendon Pinola Photography: Blog https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog en-us (C) Brendon Pinola Photography (Brendon Pinola Photography) Mon, 16 Mar 2020 06:47:00 GMT Mon, 16 Mar 2020 06:47:00 GMT https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/img/s/v-12/u772842317-o684033017-50.jpg Brendon Pinola Photography: Blog https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog 120 75 Lake Pontchatrain Wedding | Madisonville, LA https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/lake-pontchatrain-wedding-madisonville-la Lake Pontchatrain Wedding | Madisonville, LA

 

I reserve black and white conversions for a select few images, but something about this wedding conveyed alot of "texture" and little details that I think come through very powerfully in the simplicity of B&W. 
~BP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2015

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Lake Pontchatrain Basin Maritime Museum https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/lake-pontchatrain-wedding-madisonville-la Mon, 30 Mar 2015 16:17:59 GMT
Equipment continued (lenses) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/equipment-continued-lenses Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM

(click here for review) 

I love, love, love this lens and I can't see ever selling it. It's a prime lens, meaning that it has a single focal length, it doesn't zoom at all. This allows the lens to be designed with alot more simplicity than a zoom lens, which makes it smaller and lighter than zoom lenses AND allows it to  have a much wider aperture, making it great for low light and getting very shallow depth of field. It's unbearably sharp, it nails razor sharp focus more often than any other lens I own, and it's relatively lightweight for an L lens, as they normally incorporate heavy duty construction and aspherical glass elements.

On my full frame cameras, 70mm is "normal" or roughly the same view as the eye sees, neither zoomed in nor wide. So that being said, the 35mm is definitely a wide lens, but not ultra wide. It's a sweet spot for me and the perspective you get from shooting a little wider can really set your work apart, especially because to frame a shot you often have to physically move closer to your subject instead of just zoom in.

As with most of the other L lenses, it has counterparts both in the lower-end range of Canon lenses and from other companies. Canon makes $320$850 and $1,500 versions on this lens (The L of course being the most expensive) and they vary in build quality, focus accuracy, sharpness and other attributes..

Sigma also makes a 35mm f/1.4 that is rumored to be very sharp and possibly new competition for the Canon L, and it comes in $500 cheaper. I've found Sigma lenses to have the potential to be very sharp and usable in nearly any form of photography, but the build quality isn't up to the level of an L lens, and in my opinion you're more likely to get a copy of the lens that misses focus or has other problems. 

 

EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM IS

(click here for review)

This is a lens that EVERY photographer should at least aspire to have in their kit. Unless you get into shooting sports, it will probably be the most expensive lens you'll ever buy, but it is more than worth it. It has a constant maximum aperture of f/2.8, instead of an variable aperture that changes throughout the zoom range, and this is a world, nay a universe of difference from the cheap kit zooms you'll find bundled with cheap cameras at Best Buy. Most variable aperture zoom telephotos have a max aperture of f/5.6 or f/6.3 when zoomed all the  way in. A max aperture of f/2.8 is 233% (or 2 1/3 stops) brighter than f/6.3. If you're shooting in a dim reception hall, having to cut your light in half more than twice is going to make your variable aperture lens virtually useless.

Especially on a full frame camera, 70-200 is a fantastic focal range, from "normal" to a very nice portrait length. It has one of the heaviest-duty builds you'll even see in a lens and it's meant to last. It's famous for being very sharp, very accurate in terms of autofocus and it has all-around great image quality statistics.

Canon makes more versions on this lens than any other focal range (f/4L, f/4L ISf/2.8L, f/2.8L IS) but in my opinion, for a lens this crucial, you should wait until you can afford the Image Stabilization, which makes a big difference in how sharp your images stay, especially at slower shutter speeds. Nikon has their version which I've heard is also epic, and Sigma and Tamron each have their own offerings which deserve consideration since they are more affordable.

This lens is HEAVY because of all the glass and engineering technology that goes into making a lens that has a constant max aperture, is very sharp and durable, it adds up to...alot. Also, stick this big, sexy white beauty on your camera and you have INSTANT credibility :D While the 35mm is what I use most at weddings and other events, if I had to use a single lens for a portrait session it would be this one, hands down due to the flexibility of focal range, useability due to max aperture and stabilization and of course the outstanding image quality. Buy a good camera strap and get a chiropractor on speed dial. This thing is truely a millstone around the neck.

I also  sometimes carry at 1.4x teleconverter which multiplies the focal length of the lens out to 98-280mm. This comes at the cost of one full f-stop of light (the lens will not function wider than f/4). It's not a dramatic advantage in focal length, and there's also a slight drop in image quality with this attachment, so it's not something I use on a regular basis. If I had a consistent need for a fast lens longer than 200mm I would probably start shopping for a Sigma 120-300 f/2.8Canon 70-300 f/4-5.6L IS USM or Canon 100-400 f/4.5-5.6L IS USM

 

 

EF 50mm f/1.2L USM

(click here for review)

Alot of photographers would have listed the lens at the top of their list in terms of how much use it gets, and if they don't it's because it's still at the top of their wish list. It is an amazing lens. Another piece of advice that I give people who wanted to start exploring photography is to  go buy themselves a "nifty fifty." As usual, Canon offers an ultra affordable $125 version, a better quality and performance $400 version, and the $1500 mammerjammer "L". Personally, I used to own the $400 version and looking back I would have been just fine keeping that one instead of coughing up the extra grand for the L, but the L is of course an epic lens also.

50mm is a great focal length. On a full frame, it's slightly wider than the "normal" perspective, but still a very usable length for almost any situation. The wide max aperture (f/1.8, f/1.4 and f/1.2 respectively) allows low light use and a shallow depth of field for a creamy blurred out background or bokeh.

This L lens improves the speed and quietness of autofocusing noticeably from the lower versions and it's a very sharp lens. Some hold the opinion that the cheap f/1.8 version of the lens isn't really usable at apertures wider than f/2.2 or so, and the f/1.4 lens can be used at f/2 with acceptible results, whereas the f/1.2 can be used wider or (some think) even all the way open at f/1.2. It's a top choice for people who photograph kids as you need very fast autofocus to keep up with the random movements of children and the ability to grab a sharp shot in a split second.

On a "crop" body like a rebel or mid-grade body, the 50mil is about equivalent to 80mm, which is not a choice good for wide shots and groups of people, but is a very good range for portraits when combined with the wide aperture. Even if you can't see yourself ever paying $1,500 for the top of the line version, some version of the 50mil prime should be in your bag.

Sigma also makes a 50mm f/1.4 that owners claim is nearly as sharp as the L series and only slightly more expensive than the Canon mid-range. (Side-note, if you think I'm crazy for paying $1,500 for this in the first place, take a look at the $5,000 cinema lens Canon is now offering for videographers.

 

EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM

(click here for review)

In terms of image quality and awesome portraits, this lens is a beauty. In terms of size and weight, it's a beast. It's nearly as heavy as the huge 70-200 even though it's physically smaller and is, again, a prime lens with no zoom capability. Most portrait shooters that own it will call it  their favorite piece of glass and for good reason. It's a great length for flattering portraits (another link about portrait focal lengths), and on a crop sensor it equates to a 136mm f/1.2 which is even better if you don't mind the difference in image quality from the smaller image sensor. Unlike many prime lenses, the 85mil is totally usable and still beautifully sharp even all the way open at f/1.2. The ability to shoot a portrait and throw everything but a very small sliver of the subject out of focus is a powerful thing.

The reason that it ranks only 5th on my list is because for a big heavy lens like this to move around its focusing elements with enough precision to nail focus even down to within even a tiny fraction of an inch, it has be done relatively slowly. It's certainly no slouch (and for $2,200 it shouldn't be) but when shooting weddings, I find it's sometimes just slightly too slow for me to be able to grab a candid shot of a beautifull moment on the first try in the blink of an eye.

It's usually my choice for engagement and bridal sessions where I'm shooting portraits with the luxury of more time to compose and focus my shots, but during weddings it splits time with the 70-200mm depending on how fast paced the action is. Canon makes a dramatically cheaper 85mm f/1.8 USM that focuses as fast if not faster and is also very sharp for the price. Anyone but the most demanding photographer in terms of sharpness and smooth creamy bokeh would be happy with the $420 version, and of course would have $1,800 left in their pocket. That was actually the first prime lens I ever owned, and looking back I wish I never sold it.

***UPDATE 07.25.13 I recently sold my 85mm as I felt the $5,000 combined value between it and the 70-200 weren't justified by the total amount that I used them. I am planning on purchasing the Sigma 85mm 1.4 at some point though as it has very high scores on DxO mark...

Sigma 20mm f/1.8 EX

(click here for review)

I've had this lens for a long time and I still can't part with it. Coming in at "only" $629, its cheaper than most L lenses. The quality of the glass and the general engineering of the lens is inferior. It's not particular sharp at f/2.8 or wider, it has very noticeable vignetting and barrel  distortion, especially when used wide open and it doesn't control lens flare well at ALL when shooting towards the sun or other bright light source. The build quality isn't as good as Canons, and it doesn't even have a ultrasonic (or what Sigma calls Hypersonic) focusing motor, so focusing is relatively slow and noisy. Despite all these shortcomings, I have a special place in my heart / bag for this lens and wouldn't discourage anyone from at least trying one out.

If the price is too steep for a lens with these weaknesses, Sigma does make 24mm and 28mm versions that are a little cheaper, but if I went that route I'd probably go for the Canon 28mm f/1.8 as it's a very good lens for the price, and more compact than the Sigmas. (Canon also has new 24 & 28mm f/2.8 USM IS versions that are strangely high in price but have been getting very good reviews). The ultimate and most comparable contender in this category would of course be the Canon 24mm f/1.4L, but at $1,750, I haven't found enough need to add a fourth expensive prime lens that would be within a 61mm range with my 35, 50 and 85.  

Here are the reasons I haven't (as of yet) looked for a better performing super-wide option. There is no other 20mm lens from any manufacturer that opens up to f/1.8. Canon makes a 20mm f/2.8, but the performance at 2.8 isn't much better than the Sigma and the price is comparable, though the Canon does have USM autofocus. Next, the Sigma (like several other Sigma lenses) is designed to be able to achieve proper focus on an object even from a very short distance away. Sigma lists the minimum focusing distance at 7.9", which is very respectable, but take my word for it, it's actually more like 3-4". Using a super wide lens 4" from something provides a very unusual perspective. It's not flattering for portraits and creates noticeable distortion, but you can be very creative with these capabilities.

The other weaknesses are things that can be used in creative ways, but are not right for every shot, so I don't use the 20mm as often as I used to. Canon makes a variety of good wide options including the 24-105 f/4L, 24-70 (f/2.8L, f/4L ISf/2.8L II) and 24mm f/1.4L, but I don't think it will ever completely replace this lens. One of the newer Canon 24-70 lenses or possibly the newest version from Tamron are definitely on my wish list, and might be a reason to finally part with my Siggy 20mm

 

Canon 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro

(click here for review)

This is a lens you can do without until you build up a kit that will handle 99% of the shoots you'll be doing. Technically, at 100mm this lens should be good for portraits, and at f/2.8 you can get some good results, but even with USM af, this lens doesn't focus very quickly. This is because  the elements inside it have to travel a very long way to cover a range all the way from the very close ranges needed for macro work all the way out to infinity. It's also not a terribly bright lens and doesn't focus well in low light. However, it is a true macro, meaning that it can take shots at 1:1.

I don't use my macro very often at all. At weddings I really only use it for ring shots, and there are other methods and lenses that will work for up close detail shots like this, which is why I didn't spend $1,000+ on one of the L macros. It works very well for what it's specialty is, but not the best choice for much else.

 

 

 

Canon 15mm f/2.8 Fisheye

(click here for review)

Another specialty lens. On a full frame camera, the fisheye creates a full 180 degree angle of view with a ton of distortion for a wacky  perspective. Harnessing this intentional distortion is something that takes alot of practice, especially when there are people in the shot, as you don't want to warp a person's body too much or it quickly becomes an unattractive effect. Whether used to be comical or artistic, it's not something you want to do very often or the novelty of the unusual perspective will wear off in your work and you'll look like a one trick pony. I don't even necessarily use it at all on any given shoot. There are alot of fisheye lenses available, even attachments for other lenses, although I've found that true fisheye lenses can offer great sharpness and clarity, whereas the attachment lenses tend to have very poor optical performance. You can buy a fisheye without autofocus very inexpensively, but using one takes more time and trial and error to use since it can be very hard to tell if you have the shot in focus at such a wide angle. 

 

 

 

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You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the article in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 
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(Brendon Pinola Photography) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/equipment-continued-lenses Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:51:11 GMT
Equipment continued (Memory Cards) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/equipment-continued-memory-cards Lexar Professional 1000x (150mb/sec) 16GB Memory cards

Buying good memory cards is becoming more important than ever before. Almost all pro level cameras use Compact Flash cards, but a few are starting to accept Secure Digital (SD) cards. They are not as durable, but they are cheaper and easier to find in a pinch. Cards get formatted so many times that they're pretty much bound to fail at one point or another.

Since the RAW files I shoot are much larger than common jpg files, I can only fit about 500 photos on a 16GB card (a little more when using the older MKII). I've heard that when using the 36mp Nikon D800 you can't even fit 500 files on a 32GB card! My full weddings range from 30-80GB total. I bring at least 96GB to every wedding so that even if one of my cards decides to give up the ghost, I'll never run out of card space. 

Also it's very important to pay attention to the speed of your memory cards. When you're shopping for cards you'll come across cards with the same amount of storage for a wide range of prices, and there's a reason. My RAW files are up to 40MB each, and my camera can take 6 of them per second, so up to 250MB of data per second can be flying onto my memory cards. The big bad 1Dx can shoot up to 14 frames per second! The cards of yesteryear were rated to write at around 15mb/sec. If you throw 250MB at them in one second, your camera is going to freeze up and will  not take any photos until the buffer empties and all the photos are written to the card. While we don't have memory cards available that will write fast enough to take that much data continuously, we do have cards that write at 150mb/sec, so that's what I use.

Some cards are rated differently, for example 133x 233x 400x 600x or 1000x. In my opinion, 400x (60mb/sec) is now the bare minimum if you're shooting RAW, and if you have a high resolution camera like the 5D MKIII or Nikon D800 you're going to want to go faster to avoid your camera bogging down. While you can buy cards as big as 256GB or still find them as small as 1-2GB, I find that 16GB is a good size because you don't have an entire wedding loaded onto a single card (so if you lose that card you lose the whole wedding) but you don't have to keep up with a dozen different cards if you were using 4GB. I normally bring four 16GB and one 32GB cards. I've gotten flawless performance from my Lexar 1000x   cards and I also have Kingston mid-grade cards that I recommend for those who cant' afford the big boys.

When it comes to transferring the images to my computer or laptop, speed is again a factor. When I used to use slow 15mb/sec cards, transferring a full wedding to disc could be a 2hr+ task. Now I use a USB 3.0 card reader, also from Lexar that allows incredibly fast transfer speeds, and I can empty a full 16gb card in less than 2 minutes. There are Firewire card readers that offer similar performance.

 

 

Now on to the lenses, the real heart of a good camera system. There's a saying that I love that says, "Amateurs talk about cameras, professionals talk about glass..." (The saying ends with "...Masters talk about light" but that's for another blog post). I talk to up-and-coming photographers on a regular basis and I always advise them that IF they are at a place where they're only going to be investing $500-1000 in upgrading from their "amateur" level camera kit instead of throwing down the full $20,000 for an entire pro level kit, INVEST in GLASS FIRST. Sure, a Rebel or low end Nikon or Sony doesn't have the cajones of a big pro body, but realistically, every camera on the market today is light years ahead of the cameras that true pros used only 10 years ago (minus the aspect of long term durability). Now, 10 years ago it took more talent and experience to get great images out of such relatively limited equipment, but all things being equal, the cameras we have now are pretty amazing.

All those comparisons aside, your camera is only a tool. I used to feel offended when someone would say "Wow, that's a great shot, you must have an awesome camera!" But now I just reply, "Yup! I taught it everything it knows!"

Even though cameras get outdated on a seemingly monthly basis, if you buy good lenses, you can keep them for a very long time with no problems. When I started in photography full time, I made the mistake of buying lenses as fast as I could, finding the cheapest version of a certain type of lens that I could, and I ended up finding the limitations of those lenses very quickly, selling them for a big loss, and spending alot more money on the lenses that I really wanted. For this reason, I also advise photogs looking to move up to do whatever they can to invest in gear that they know they won't have to replace soon. Generally speaking Canon's "L" series lenses are awesome,  but there are lenses from other brands that may have a place in your bag as well. I'll list my current lens lineup in order of which spend the most time on my camera.

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/equipment-continued-memory-cards Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:49:50 GMT
Equipment continued (cameras) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/equipment-continued-cameras  

First off, I'm a Canon guy. Nothing at all against Nikon. If I could afford to own a full kit of both brands I would, but at the costs of lenses and keeping everything maintained and up to date that would just be rediculous. Both have stronger and weaker aspects, obviously neither is the clear superior. They even leapfrog each other periodically in certain aspects, which keeps the competition up to always improve. In fact, before the latest fleet of cameras from Canon were released I was thinking about switcing to Nikon, but thankfully, my new camera (read on) is (in my opinion) the finest camera for wedding photographers ever made. Your move Nikon. 

I buy all my equipment from B&H Photo. Although they have a zillion (Hebrew) holidays throughout the year that they are closed during, they generally have the largest selection, consistently good prices, and a healthy amount of reviews about most products.

EOS 5D Mark III 

(click here for review)

This is my main camera body. I love it!!! It's a 22.3 megapixel full frame camera. In this day and age, high resolution isn't as important for event photography as is the ability to quickly lock focus and get clean, crisp images in very low light. It has dual card slots, which is a great feature! With as many photos as I shoot, my memory cards get filled and emptied very often and this raises the possibilty of one failing. Having photos saved to two cards at once all but elliminates the possibility of losing a  critical photo in the middle of a wedding or other photo shoot. I also have the option to have one card serve as an "rollover card" so that if I happen to fill the main card at an inopportune moment I won't have to stop shooting.

The battery in the camera is rated to about 1,000 shots per charge, and I go way over that, so I have the battery grip that holds two batteries, plus gives you the ability to shoot vertical shots without using a different hand position since duplicate controls are on the side of the grip. I find this helps me keep vertical shots lined up better since I don't have to reach around awkwardly.

The MK3 has a very fast and accurate autofocus system and it works even in the very dim lighting situations that come up all the time during a wedding. It also maintains very clean images even at very high ISO so I don't have to sacrifice image quality for a properly exposed photo.

I shoot in RAW, and if you're a pro shooter, you absolutely have to. There's some shooters out there that insist that if you "get it in camera" in other words, use the best possible camera settings and/or lighting techniques, you don't need much further editing, but it's important to understand that the human eye is much much more capable than even the best camera sensor, and the amount of luminocity and tone that can be captured in a single photo is much lower than what we see with our naked eyes. Even if you take the "perfect shot" there is always something there that can be improved with editing, and shooting RAW gives you almost infinitely more flexibility in this regard. I won't explain the whole process, but think of it in these terms. If you had to write a song, would you want to pick 8 keys of a piano first and then write a whole song using only those keys, or would you just want to keep the whole piano? You probably will not end up needing all 88 keys, but having those extra 10 octave will open up so many more options for you.

I use full manual settings (M on the contol dial) 99.999% of the time. Even a top of the line camera like this isn't quite to the point that it can make decisions as well as I can with its Auto, "P for Professional" and priority modes..

 

EOS 5D Mark II

(click here for review)

EVERY professional photographer should have a backup camera. When you're shooting thousands of images at a time on a weekly basis, even a high end camera has a possibility of having its shutter break or some other error develop at any time. Furthermore, I don't believe that your backup camera should be the Rebel or whatever consumer grade camera you just upgraded from if you're new in the market. If your  camera goes out in the first hour of wedding coverage, your client doesn't deserve subpar photos because your backup gear couldn't stand up to the challenges of the wedding day.

My backup camera is the  5D Mark II (previously my primary body). Yes, it's a generation older than the MKIII, but tons of top end wedding pros still use this body and it's capable of brilliant image quality. I've shot many great weddings with my MKII and if my MKIII were to bite the dust, I'd be bummed, but I wouldn't be the least bit nervous about whether or not I could continue to deliver the quality of images my client hired me for.

I have the time signatures of my cameras synced together so that if I happen to use both bodies at once, or have to switch to the backup my photos will sort chronologically during editing without any problems.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/equipment-continued-cameras Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:48:26 GMT
The Battle House, Mobile, AL | Mariaya & Michael's Wedding https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/the-battle-house-mobile-al-mariaya-michaels-wedding

The Battle House, Mobile, AL | Mariaya & Michael's Wedding

 

Mariaya's wedding is one I will never forget, not just the day itself but the details surrounding it. She was married to Michael at the Battle House in downtown Mobile, AL on Christmas Eve 2012. It's almost a four hour drive from where I live to Mobile, so on top of the holiday becoming a long work day, I had 8 hours of additional time driving to get home at 3am Christmas morning. The natural thought would be, "why would anyone want to get married on Christmas Eve?" The day held special meaning for the couple and they had a history of celebrating it with family and intended to have, not necessarily a small wedding, but an intimate one with just their closest friends and family. It was certainly a cheery day and the closeness of the couple with their loved ones was visible and made it obvious that there was no where anyone would rather be. I especially remember that the food from the Marriott Renaissance-owned hotel was phenomenal. Thought the weather was sunny, it was quite cold and the entire wedding took place inside the hotel, and I made liberal use of one of my then-recent lighting purchase, a PCB Einstein strobe. It allowed me to add natural-looking beautiful lighting where the available electric and window lighting was "intimate" (see: dim). 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) The battle house battle house wedding birmingham wedding photography mobile wedding photographer wedding at the battle house https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/the-battle-house-mobile-al-mariaya-michaels-wedding Wed, 11 Mar 2015 18:07:42 GMT
Stonebridge Farms Wedding | Brendon Pinola Photography https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/stonebridge-farms-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography

 

 

CAITLIN & TODD | STONEBRIDGE FARMS | CULLMAN, AL

Caitlin and Todd were married at Stonebridge Farms in Cullman, AL on February 28th, 2015. The weeks surrounding their weather brought the craziest weather you'd ever see in Alabama. We had 40° temperature swings. Seventy one day, almost a foot of snow the next. Cullman got some of the most snow only days before the wedding and the sun hadn't been sighted in weeks it seemed. That wasn't the end of the trouble, the families of the bride and groom had several last minute emergencies even spilling over into the wedding day itself, but you would never have known it talking to the bride. She was rock solid, and nature must respect that because on the wedding day the sun came out, the temperature came up to short-sleeves levels (shorts and flip-flops for me when I'm not at a wedding) and the snow started to melt. This of course left the ground soggy and muddy but even with that Caitlin insisted that she would not shy away from going outside in her beautiful gown and as her photographer at her beautiful venue, I salute her bravery. Through it all the day went smoothly and a great time was had by all.

Venue: Stonebridge Farms
DJ: My Event DJ
Ceremony music / vocals: Amber Hayes
Car service: Apollo limo
Catering: Stonebridge Farms
Cakes: Dreamcakes / Cupcakes: Edgar's Bakery
Flowers: Stonebridge Farms
Wedding Dress: Bella's Bridal
Bridesmaids Dresses: Bella's Bridal
Tuxes: Joseph A. Bank
Favors: Cupcakes - Edgar's Bakery / Cups - TheAmericanWedding
Decor: Stonebridge Farms (and mother of the bride )
Bridesmaid's Favors: Jewelry- BeYourselfJewerly on Etsy, Tumblers- Tervis

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham wedding photographer cullman weddings stonebridge farms weddings https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/stonebridge-farms-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Tue, 10 Mar 2015 11:53:40 GMT
Rucker Place Wedding | Brendon Pinola Photography https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/rucker-place-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Ashley and Freddie are a great match! During their consultation, engagement session and wedding they were beaming at each other non-stop and I never had to prompt a natural reaction between them. They were married at Historic Rucker Place in Birmingham's Southside.
 

Venue: Historic Rucker Place
DJ: Professor Beatz (O.Z. Hall)
Violinist: Susie Shortt
Car service: Sweet Glide Vintage Ride
Catering: Savoie Catering 
Cakes: Pastry Art Bake Shoppe
Flowers: LSL Event Design
Wedding Dress: Alfred Angelo
Bridesmaids Dresses: Alfred Angelo
Tuxes: Men's Wearhouse
Favors: Koozies by Christine Meahan Designs on Etsy
Decor: Jeannene Griesbach of Historic Rucker Place and Laure Friedman of LSL Event Design
Bridesmaid's Favors: Theresa Kochevar of 3 Stitches, LLC
 
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(Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham wedding photographer historic rucker place rucker place southside birmingham weddings southside wedding photography southside weddings https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/rucker-place-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Mon, 09 Mar 2015 13:28:00 GMT
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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Engagement photos in Birmingham https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/2/heather-walter Sun, 08 Feb 2015 22:48:41 GMT
Fountainview Mansion Wedding in Auburn | Brendon Pinola Photography https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/10/fountainview-mansion-wedding-in-auburn-brendon-pinola-photography Haley and Brett were married in their hometown of Auburn, AL at the fabulous Fountainview Mansion.

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Venue - Fountainview Mansion
Catering - Southern Hospitality
Cakes - Sonshine Cakes
Photography - Brendon Pinola Photography
Videography - SunDolphin Productions
Photobooth - Imago Photography
Ceremony Music - The Auburn Quartet
Reception DJ - DJ-OZZ
Officiate - Faulkner Law Dean / Minister Matt Vega
Coordinator - Invision Events - Wade Welch, Julie Bunkley
Hair Stylist - Rudy Maddox
Make-up - Amp Camp
Invitations - Auburn Awards & Fine Papers
Dresses & Accessories- Simply Elegant, J. Andrews Bridal & Formal
Tuxedos - Jos. A. Bank
Rehearsal Dinner - Saugahatchee Country Club
Guest Accomodations - Hampton Inn, Auburn Hotel & CC

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) auburn wedding photographer birmingham wedding photographer fountainview mansion fountainview weddings https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/10/fountainview-mansion-wedding-in-auburn-brendon-pinola-photography Mon, 13 Oct 2014 00:24:17 GMT
Bourbon Orleans Hotel Wedding | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/4/bourbon-orleans-hotel-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Christina and Jeff were married at the Bourbon Orleans Hotel in the French Quarter in March of 2014.

 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2014

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Bourbon Orleans Wedding French Quarter wedding https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/4/bourbon-orleans-hotel-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Mon, 28 Apr 2014 00:47:28 GMT
The time I was almost a terrorist threat. https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/4/the-time-i-was-almost-a-terrorist-threat "Should I use my powers for good...or evil?"

Where ever two or more photographers are gathered, the conversation will inevitably gravitate to experiences we've had with would-be clients who we could not come to an understanding with on the topic of the price of our craft. Even though there are hundreds, thousands of photographers out there charging well over a thousand dollars a day for the images they create, I for one am still regularly inundated with folks who can't seem to grasp that the time, preparation, experience, vision, and many types of investments that a true professional has made enable them to deliver empirically superior results to those of an amatuer flying by the seat of their pants. Why is it that people seem to lump everyone with a camera into one category called "photographer?" This whole whirlwind of frustration descended upon me this morning in a completely new way that left me strangely encouraged, and yet....still bummed out. Read on...

My wife and I are in Boston (my hometown) for a few days. She has work during the day, so as is our tradition, I spend the day walking the city with a camera and tripod, looking for nothing in particular, but almost always finding something wicked awesome :-D. We were staying on Copley Square which is adjacent to the Prudential Tower (one of the two tallest buildings on the Boston skyline). We were here four years ago and I took some photos in the area and now that I have better equipment, better techniques etc, I wanted to take another crack at it. Near the hotel there is a massive reflecting pool. It's gorgeous, with a rolled marble border that acts as an infinity edge, the surface of the water gently tumbling over it. Next to the pool is the World headquarters of the Church of Christian Science. Their beliefs aside, their mother church building is very stunning, and it all adds up to a vista that you can't pass up. As I walked around the reflecting pool taking test shots and looking for the best angle for the composition I wanted, I noticed some security guards in yellow vests driving golf carts, and one seemed to be looking right at me as he reached for his 2-way radio. I wasn't alarmed. In cities since Sept 11th 2001 it seems like everyone imagines that they will be the one to catch the next Bin Laden that is plotting right under their noses.

I made my way to the far end of the pool and set up my tripod, mounted the camera and started dialing in my exposure settings. As I started shooting, a guy in a partially tucked-in white oxford with a messy armload of notebook papers walks up from the street. He seems to be very stressed out about something, sort of in a very big hurry, but not really going anywhere in particular. The fact that he looked a ton like Richard Kind was a real treat for me and I guess I gave him just enough of a sideways glance and smile that he immediately felt the need to explain his slightly disheveled appearance and darty movements. "I've got a job interview in a little while! Can you tell I'm not nervous at all about it?!" As he finished his sentence he seemed to decide to stop and chat awhile. He set his notebook and papers down on a bench right behind where I was standing. He turned around with another sentence forming on his lips, and the scene I was setting up to capture must have hit him all at once because he literally lost his breath for a second and then said, "WOW, man what a view, I'm gonna have to try out this new camera!" He fumbled in his pocket and came out with a massive smartphone and started fiddling with the cover trying to figure out which end you point and which you look at. At this point, I'm not even upset that he's unabashedly bogarting my photo, and I'm about to make some wisecrack about smartphones only being as smart as the operator when a huge gust of wind whips up off the Charles River and carries all his precious papers toward Huntington Avenue and certain destruction and his job interview along with them. He lets out a shriek and hustles after them in a panic. 

If you know me, you know I'm not above laughing at someone else's tragedy. If something's funny, it's funny, but I don't know this guy at all, some I'm holding back some chuckles as he keeps reaching down just to have the wind grab the papers again. One paper hadn't gone far, so I reached down and gently pinned it with my foot and then picked it up and waited for him to return. He finally did, out of breath, and promptly set the papers right down where they were before, and they promptly blew away again. "NOT AGAIN!" he bellowed and I finally laughed out loud. Surely he couldn't hold it against me, this is something out of a movie and my day is off to a great start.

As Spin City is putting his life back together, a stereotypical Vietnamese elderly couple shuffles up, the man with a big smile on his face like he found the fountain of youth. In his defense, he probably always looks that way. He positions his wife at the edge of the reflecting pool and then steps back a few feet and starts poking at the buttons on his Canon Rebel. It's so new that the red and black neck strap is still creased into neat loops from when it came folded and rubberbanded in the box. I'm about to turn back to my work before anything even stranger happens when I take one last glance back at Spin City and I see trouble coming.

The security guard who I saw from a distance has walked all the way around the pool towards me and he's brought a serious looking young woman with him. I've only got 3 seconds before they're close enough to start talking to whoever they came to talk to (I wonder) but in that time I have time to wonder, "did he go get her because she's his boss, or because she's better at confronting people? Or maybe she's better with a sidearm...."

"Excuse me sir," she said, in a not unfriendly tone, but still with a enough volume and annunciation to reinforce the official nature of her visit. Now that I think about it, I think she said said excuse me, with the "sir" but whatever, I'm not in Alabama anymore, you have to earn it up here. 

So let's pause real quick to review the scene. There's a bumbly guy with his smartphone and a bundle of scribblings of a reinvented wheel or something. There's me, and there's the Vietnamese couple. All of us with cameras pointed across the reflecting pool at the Christian Science center and Prudential tower. Three of us, or four for those keeping score, but it seems clear that the guards are approaching one of us. I feign confusion and look around as if to see who was going to respond, but my wry smile betrays me, so I look her in the eye and prepare to bust out my best Jason Bourne combat moves, or grab the camera and high-tail it like a scalded dog and see how good a charge the golf cart has. I decided to face the music and responded. "yes..?"

"Who are you with?"

"I'm with me."

"You're not with Channel 5 or something are you? You need permission to take pictures here." 

At this point the Vietnamese couple have vanished into thin air, strange considering that I can see a long way in every direction. Spin City seems to suddenly need to go to his interview and mutters something about being late. I call "good luck!" after him, hoping that if I act like he and I are friends on some level that it will lend credence that the Canon on my tripod is only for taking pictures, not for firing terrorist Canon-balls. Now we're alone, but her stance hasn't changed. Just then I notice now that she's closer that her yellow shirt says "Church of Christian Science" on it. Am I going to be hauled into the basement of that castle and tried as a heretic and dismembered??

"No I'm not working. I am a professional, but this is just for fun....personal use." Ah yes, the magical phrase, personal use. That makes it all better, right? Kinda like personal space? Personal preference? You can't argue when it's personal.

Surprisingly, her tone did change then. She seemed to already be turning away to walk away. "That's fine, we just have to make sure people aren't publishing or selling anything without authorization. Have a good day."

Ok for those who are still reading, you've probably noticed that my topic paragraph now seems completely disconnected from the story I just told. I admit, I just had to tell the beginning part because it was so funny to me, but in the end, do you see what I was getting at? The guards saw three cameras pointed at the same thing. They never had the first thought about the Rebel and the smartphone. Part of their job is to be on the lookout for photographers and they didn't confuse anyone me. The obvious reason that they moved to say something to me, or anyone else they feel is a genuine possibility of a problem for them and their organization is that they knew that the power of influence and effect of a professional photograph can be far-reaching. If someone is going to write a damaging article about Christian Science, or whatever they were afraid of, they don't send someone with a smart phone. So to bring things fully back around, the guards can easily tell the difference between an enthusiast amater and a pro. But when someone needs to hire a photographer and their money is involved, they immediately mentally bring everyone down to a very low level and attribute very little value or worth to what we do, even though they will still expect high quality results. 

This comes from a biased place, and I welcome comments on the topic, but there's a system ratio in my mind that applies to many things that people do for a living. Take a service like replacing an engine, preparing a meal, stitching up a cut on your forehead, bagging groceries, a car ride to the airport, whatever. (Or for the sake of this one-way discussion imagine that you need wedding photography services that cannot be replaced or re-shot, you have one chance to get it right) On a scale of 1-10, rate a service on how hard it would be for you yourself could personally take care of the need that that service addresses, and whether you would produce the exact same result as the paid professional. Keep in mind that depending on the service, if you aren't even capable of producing the desired results even with more time and more trial and error than you're willing to give a paid professional, you have to surrender a full 10 points to the service in this column.  Next, from 1-10 rate how inconvenient or time-consuming it would be for you to do this thing to the best of your ability. For the heck of it, rate how much of a problem it would be if this thing was NOT done properly. Lastly, from 1-10 rate how important it is to you that this thing be done in an excellent and profession manor, in a timely and convenient fashion and the end product must be very high quality. NOW, add those scores up for a number somewhere between 4 and 40, or at least take a stab at it. The higher the score, the higher the price will be, and for the reasons laid out in the score. If the service is cooking a hamburger, the score will probably be pretty low. If it's a world-class, kobe-beef gourmet burger, bump the score up.  If it's brain surgery, go ahead and max it out with all tens. If you care about photography and it's important that the pictures be excellent, there will be a high score. If you don't care about photography and you're not looking for anything better than what you can do with your smartphone or Rebel (and little or no experience), go ahead and give it a low score. If you think you can get a "40" photographer for a "4" price, you're essentially saying that you can do just as good a job as the photographer will, but you want him or her to deliver much better photos than you can take (stay with me here). It's not important that they do a professional job, but you want them to be excellent. It doesn't really matter what the end product looks like, but it better be awesome. Doesn't make alot of sense does it? Nope. You get what you pay for.  If you want something great, go shopping for great. If you expect to find great for the same price as "meh" you are devaluing the photographer and his or her craft, and in a backwards way asking them to willing participate in a robbery of themselves. 

 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2014

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) How did they know? photos of boston professional photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/4/the-time-i-was-almost-a-terrorist-threat Thu, 24 Apr 2014 20:58:15 GMT
Burritt on the Mountain Wedding | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/4/burritt-on-the-mountain-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Cari and Parker held their March 2014 wedding at historic Burritt on the Mountain in Huntsville, AL. The stunning scenic view was the backdrop for their ceremony and spirits were high for the reception in the Baron Bluff reception hall.

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Burritt on the mountain huntsville wedding https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/4/burritt-on-the-mountain-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Thu, 10 Apr 2014 21:54:35 GMT
Engagement Session in Old Town Helena https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/engagement-session-in-old-town-helena Old Town Helena, AL
 

Ashley grew up in Helena, AL, and though she and her fiance Gary live in Madison now, they called me out to Helena for their engagement session to bring their own personality to the session and make some new memories to go with the old. The weather was amazing for February and we got some very nice photos. Ashley's dog Gus even made a cameo!

 

Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos © Brendon Pinola Photography 2014

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/engagement-session-in-old-town-helena Sun, 23 Feb 2014 16:41:09 GMT
Mountain View Ballroom | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/mountain-view-ballroom-brendon-pinola-photography Mountain View Ballroom and Gardens

 

Shauna and Alex were married at Mountain View Ballroom and Gardens in August of 2012. The threat of rain didn't phase them, though it did inspire a beautiful sunset shot featuring one of my photo umbrellas!

 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2014

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham wedding photographer mountainview ballroom photos mountainview ballroom weddings mountainview photos springville, al wedding https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/mountain-view-ballroom-brendon-pinola-photography Wed, 19 Feb 2014 02:12:49 GMT
I taught my camera everything it knows https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/i-taught-my-camera-everything-it-knows "Equipment is a tool, not a goal"

There's a saying that I LOVE that goes something like this: "Amateurs talk about cameras. Pros talk about glass (lenses). Masters talk about light." The gist of that saying is that as you get better in photography, you start to recognize the difference between a tool that helps you create a photograph and the actual ingredients of a great photo and you rely less on the camera and more on the part of the photo that comes from within yourself. An expensive camera is not a necessary ingredient to a great photo. Beautiful lighting is. A fancy zoom lens is not an ingredient. A beautiful moment of inspiration is.

All the time when I'm planning a session with an engaged couple or other client and we get to the part when we decide the time and place of the shoot, I almost always parrot this mantra: "I'll take good lighting over a beautiful location every time." Obviously I'd love to have both, but given a choice I'd rather have the proper ingredients to get the best result. 

Ok last little rant and then I have a little challenge for you

At weddings, one of the most frustrating moments is when someone, who it seems has been shopping around some camera gear or has an interest in photography and a decent camera walks up to me during a lull and starts drooling over the $6,000 of metal, glass and magnesium allow in my hands. When they finally find their powers of speech, the first syllables are usually something like "man that's a nice camera, I'll bet it takes awesome pictures!" It's so frustrating! Do they think that all I am is a pair of hands that has had a nice camera fall into them? I appreciate what my camera can do, but without knowing how to use it it can't do anything more than the cheapest camera you can find will do.

Well, to fight that sentiment and to show that you DON'T need to spend a ton of money on camera gear to make awesome photos, you just need to learn how to use and control light and master the functions of the camera you already have, I brought two cameras to a newborn session this afternoon, both to test out the one I recently bought, but also to hopefully demonstrate a point.

 

The first is my workhorse. A $3,500 Canon 5D Mark III full frame DSLR with a $2,400 24-70mm pro lens on it. It has a massive image sensor inside that gathers a ton of light, enabling it to take very VERY high quality photos even in low light. 

The second camera is my Canon G15 point-and-shoot camera. It's not even Canon's newest "G" model, there's actually 3 cameras in the "G" line that are better than this one, and I picked it up for $350 (90% cheaper than the Mark III) It has a fixed zoom lens and an image sensor that is the David to the Mark III's Goliath (see chart below, the G15 is comparable to the S90) It's a great little camera to have, mainly because I can't haul around the huge workhorse on a daily basis, but it definitely has serious limits, not to mention not having the same WOW factor :-)

 

 

 

 

 

I set both cameras to the same settings, ISO200 1/200th sec and f/2.8 and fired away at little Baby Hayes. Can you tell which camera made which photo? Leave your guess as a comment (no peeking ahead). I included close up crops for pixel-peepers so you can compare the sharpness.

The first photo are from the Mark III and the second is from the G15, but I was extremely pleased with the results from both! I'll admit, I was using some studio lighting that made it a little easier for the camera, but I found that the G15 was more than capable of producing great images and I'd be confident that I would not be overly handicapped if I was forced to use it in a pinch. 

 

If seeing this just frustrates you because you feel that you'll never understand how to use your camera no matter how good it is, just drop me a line from my website. I've trained dozens of photographers of all skill levels and I offer lessons that will definitely improve your photography and make it more enjoyable for you. 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2015

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) learn how to use your camera https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/i-taught-my-camera-everything-it-knows Thu, 13 Feb 2014 01:37:20 GMT
Birmingham Botanical Gardens | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/birmingham-botanical-gardens-brendon-pinola-photography Birmingham Botanical Gardens | Brendon Pinola Photography

 

Brittany had her Bridal portraits shot at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in the Spring of 2013. 

 

 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2014

www.brendonpinolaphotography.com

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Bridal portraits birmingham botanical gardens birmingham wedding photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/birmingham-botanical-gardens-brendon-pinola-photography Tue, 04 Feb 2014 22:05:46 GMT
Tuscaloosa / Northport engagement session | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/tuscaloosa-/-northport-engagement-session-brendon-pinola-photography Tuscaloosa / Northport Engagement Session | Brendon Pinola Photography

 

Joy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Stay tuned for another blog post of their wedding at Sixth Avenue Baptist Church in Birmingham and reception at the Cahaba Grand. Their wedding photos are being featured in Birmingham Weddings and Celebrations magazine in the Winter 2014 issue. So psyched!

 

Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. © Brendon Pinola Photography 2014

www.Brendonpinolaphotography.com

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) tuscaloosa photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/tuscaloosa-/-northport-engagement-session-brendon-pinola-photography Sun, 02 Feb 2014 21:34:25 GMT
Engagement Session at Mathew's Manor | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/engagement-session-at-mathews-manor-brendon-pinola-photography Engagement Session at Mathew's Manor | Brendon Pinola Photography

Leslie and Matthew will be married at Mathew's Manor next month, but they were so taken with the beauty of the venue that we decided to take engagement photos there also while we still had some fall colors. I edited the photos with a tilt shift emulator, a cooling RGB curve and tone overlay a mild texture overlay for an overall fashion vibe. 

 

Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Birmingham wedding photographer Mathew's Manor engagement session https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/engagement-session-at-mathews-manor-brendon-pinola-photography Sun, 02 Feb 2014 15:57:42 GMT
Post-bridals with the Beetle https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/1/post-bridals-with-the-beetle Birmingham wedding photography

Lauren and Adam called me out for some photos after their wedding and Adam brought his project car - a souped up VW Beetle Convertible. I love it when clients bring their own personality and interests into their photos.

 

Bridal Portraits with the VW BeetleBridal Portraits with the VW BeetleLauren's bridal portraits with Birmingham Wedding Photographer Brendon Pinola at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens Bridal Portraits with the VW BeetleBridal Portraits with the VW BeetleLauren's bridal portraits with Birmingham Wedding Photographer Brendon Pinola at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens Bridal Portraits with the VW BeetleBridal Portraits with the VW BeetleLauren's bridal portraits with Birmingham Wedding Photographer Brendon Pinola at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham wedding photograper bridal portraits https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/1/post-bridals-with-the-beetle Fri, 31 Jan 2014 11:49:58 GMT
Huntsville Museum of Art Wedding | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/1/huntsville-museum-of-art-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography The Huntsville Museum of Art was the site where Rob and Sarah celebrated in late 2012 after their wedding ceremony at St Mark's Lutheran Church. Rob and his army buddies kept the party going all night. They had their engagement session at various landmarks in Birmingham, AL and Sara had her bridal portraits shot at Big Springs Park in Huntsville.

 

Photography: Brendon Pinola Photography
Prep: Embassy Suites Hotel, Huntsville, AL
Ceremony: St Mark's Lutheran Church
Reception: Huntsville Museum of Art
Dress: Maggie Sottero
Shoes: Design Your Pedastal
Cakes
Rings:
DJ:
Invitations:
Flowers:

 

Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave

 

Sarah's Bridal portraitsBig Springs Park, Huntsville AL Sarah's Bridal portraitsBig Springs Park, Huntsville AL Sarah's Bridal portraitsBig Springs Park, Huntsville AL Sarah's Bridal portraitsBig Springs Park, Huntsville AL

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Birmingham Botanical Gardens Embassy Suites Huntsville Museum of Art Morris Ave, Birmingham AL Sloss Furnace https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/1/huntsville-museum-of-art-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Fri, 24 Jan 2014 22:47:42 GMT
Friends and Family https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/1/friends-and-family I Love this shot from a recent wedding where even without seeing faces you can feel everything that is happening. Nerves being calmed only hours before the wedding ceremony. Experience being shared getting the dress just right. The rare opportunity to nearly feel nostalgic about the present as common tradition meets with the singularity of your own life. 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2014
www.brendonpinolaphotography.com

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham wedding photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/1/friends-and-family Wed, 08 Jan 2014 17:49:48 GMT
Bragg-Mitchell Mansion | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/12/bragg-mitchell-mansion-wedding-photos Bragg-Mitchell Mansion in Mobile, AL
Brendon Pinola Photography
Chastang / Thrash Wedding

Venue: Bragg-Mitchell Mansion
Rings: Zales
Wedding Gown: The Timeless Bride - Mobile, AL
Tuxes: J. Ferrar
Hair / MUA: Nou Veau Salon and Day Spa - Mobile, AL
Decor: CVLinens.com, handmade items from thrift stores etc.
Lighting: Showbiz Theatrical Services
DJ: Gary Fuller
Pastor: Dr Gregory Pouncey - First Baptist Tillman's Corner
Catering and Cakes: Kandies by Karen - Bay Minette, AL
Flowers: Belle Bouquet Florist and Gifts - Saraland, AL
First dance: Michael Buble' - You and I
Father / Daughter dance: Steven Curtis Chapman - Cinderella
Mother / Son dance: Phil Collins - You'll be in my Heart


 

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© Brendon Pinola Photography 2013
www.brendonpinolaphotography.com

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Bragg-Mitchell Mansion Mobile wedding photography Mobile, AL wedding photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/12/bragg-mitchell-mansion-wedding-photos Mon, 09 Dec 2013 23:17:01 GMT
The Sonnet House | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/12/the-sonnet-house-emily-chris-april-wedding Emily and Chris were married at The Sonnet House in Leeds, AL on April 6th, 2013. 
© Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

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Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris

Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris

Emily & ChrisEmily & Chris

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham wedding photographer sonnet house weddings https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/12/the-sonnet-house-emily-chris-april-wedding Fri, 06 Dec 2013 22:24:42 GMT
Mathew's Manor | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/12/mathews-manor-brendon-pinola-photography Mathew's Manor Wedding (Springville, AL)
Brendon Pinola Photography

Venue: Mathew's Manor (Rebecca's Garden)
Bride: Jessica Brown
Groom: Jordan Brown:
Bridesmaids: Kristy Jackson, Erica Grieve, Jamila Isbell, Regan Brewer, Alexus Brown
Groomsmen: Ward Brewer, Chad Brewer, Josh Brown, Erik Grieve, Brandon Isbell
Bride's Dress: Bella's Bridal, Hoover
Bridesmaids dresses: Bridesmaids Inc, Homewood
Tux(es): Jos A Bank, Hoover
Cakes / Catering: Mathews Manor
Favors: Made by The Bride
Flowers: Mathews Manor
Make up artist / hair stylist / salon: Hair Centre Salonspa, Pell City
DJ / lighting: Michael Vice
Planning: Carol @ Mathews Manor
Rings: Zales
Photography: Brendon Pinola Photography

 
© Brendon Pinola Photography 2013
 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham photographer birmingham wedding photography mathew's manor trussville photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/12/mathews-manor-brendon-pinola-photography Wed, 04 Dec 2013 19:24:00 GMT
Professional photography services https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/12/professional-photography-services Brendon Pinola Photography
Serving Birmingham and the entire southeast

Brendon Pinola has years of experience crafting the best possible image using creative vision, applied by technical expertise. Whether preserving a precious fleeting memory, making a client look their very best in a portrait, showing the potential beauty in everyday life or making a product or service much more marketable with powerful, eye-catching photos that "POP", Brendon is always eager for a new project, assignment, wedding or friendship. Contact him today to find out what he can do better for you!

 

 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2013
www.brendonpinolaphotography.com
205.907.4095

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/12/professional-photography-services Wed, 04 Dec 2013 18:49:20 GMT
Moore's Mill Golf Club Wedding | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/11/moores-mill-golf-club-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography


Bride: Rainey Pearson
Groom: Walter Brown
Wedding Venue: Moore's Mill Golf Club, Auburn, AL
Photographer: Brendon Pinola Photography
Dress: Sottero and Midgley
Shoes: Nina New York
Makeup: Lindsey McCord
Rings:
Catering: Moore's Mill Club and Walter Brown
Cake: Cakes by Tania
Flowers / Decor:
Ceremony musicians: Auburn String Quartet
Band: East American Entertainment, Inc. / Atlanta Pleasure Band

Carriage: Memories in Motion Classics
Bridesmaids: Jessica Bennett, Erica Cannon, Lizzy Givan, Catherine Sapp, Lesleigh MacNabb, Fawn Smith, Emily Kate Rubio, Anne Marie Neill
Groomsmen: Danny Brown (best man), Casey Child, Garnett Reynolds, Mitchell Pearson, Brittain Lawson, Carson Sears, Joe Parks, Benje MacNabb
Honoraries: 
Lindsey McCord, Adrianne Harris, Lindsey Davidson, Liz Fulghom, Kristen Corrigan, Jana Shepherd
 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) auburn wedding photography moore's mill golf club wedding at moore's mill https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/11/moores-mill-golf-club-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Sun, 24 Nov 2013 13:28:13 GMT
Birmingham Commercial Photographer | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/11/birmingham-commercial-photographer-brendon-pinola-photography Commercial Project: Riverchase Galleria
Client: Fabric Architecture Ltd (UK)

 

“Brendon captured our Fabric Canopies at Riverchase Galleria Mall beautifully and his photographs are beyond what we were expecting to receive.  His pricing was very reasonable but what he delivered was First Class.

We will certainly use him again and highly recommend his work.  Thank you so much Brendon, we’re delighted!”

 

Fabric Architecture Ltd, Gloucester, United Kingdom



© Brendon Pinola Photography 2013
www.brendonpinolaphotography.com

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham photographer commercial photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/11/birmingham-commercial-photographer-brendon-pinola-photography Thu, 21 Nov 2013 22:24:26 GMT
"Crappy vs Snappy" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/9/-crappy-vs-snappy Here is a great article illustrating the reasons why key images made by a professional photographer can put your company, product or brand over the top in ways that "just good enough" images you capture yourself or a non-professional captures. Enjoy!

http://miningindustrialphotographer.com/crappy-vs-snappy/

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/9/-crappy-vs-snappy Fri, 13 Sep 2013 00:22:18 GMT
Sixth Avenue Baptist Church | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/8/sixth-avenue-baptist-church-cahaba-grand-conference-center Joy McCampbell and Douglas Craddock were married on August 10th 2013 at Sixth Avenue Baptist in Birmingham, AL with reception following at the Cahaba Grand conference center. 

Ceremony: Sixth Avenue Baptist Church
Bride’s Dress:  Rivini from Lori’s Bridal – Atlanta, GA
Bridesmaids Dresses:  Bridesmaids, Inc.
Groom/Groomsmen Tuxes:  Jos A. Bank
Hairstylist/Makeup Artist:  Jean Wilson-Sykes of Ulta – Tuscaloosa, AL
Wedding Planner: Daphne Reid-Herrin of Herrin Hospitality – Atlanta, GA
Decorator/Florist:  Jackie  Johns
Favors:  The Knot.com
Caterer:  The Cahaba Grand
Cake:  Olexa’s Cakes
Reception Band:  The Connection Band
Wedding Bands:  Reed’s Jewelers
Engagement Ring:  Zales

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

www.brendonpinolaphotography.com






 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) cahaba grand sixth ave baptist wedding https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/8/sixth-avenue-baptist-church-cahaba-grand-conference-center Sat, 31 Aug 2013 14:10:36 GMT
Canterbury UMC | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/8/canterbury-umc-carraway-davie-house-wedding Lane Thomas and Graham Brown were married at Canterbury UMC in Birmingham, AL on August 24th, 2013, with reception following at the Carraway Davie House.

Bridesmaids: Allison Westlake, Leslie Crawford, Rebecca mccaleb, Melissa bonds, kori harrow, Laura Steul, Stephanie cannon, Ashley Vibert, Evan Alderson
Groomsmen: Jonathan Brown, Jay Brown, Shawn McGregor, Kirk Thomas, Steven Kimmel, Steven Lloyd, Christopher Mitchell, Scott Stanley 
Dress: The Carriage House
Tuxes: Men's Warehouse
Cake/catering/flowers/planning: Carraway-Davie House
Hair and makeup: Katie at Hair Impressions in Vestavia
Band: Onlive
Rings: Geoffrey Girling (a family friend)

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

www.brendonpinolaphotography.com



 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) canterbury umc carraway davie house https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/8/canterbury-umc-carraway-davie-house-wedding Sun, 25 Aug 2013 11:09:03 GMT
Pinterist https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/8/pinterist A great read about the inspiration caused AND destroyed by Pinterist.]]> (Brendon Pinola Photography) creativity pinterist https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/8/pinterist Sun, 18 Aug 2013 22:22:50 GMT The Photo Sign-in Album https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/7/the-photo-guestbook

The guestbook is tired.  A year after your wedding or event if you pull it out, you have what? A list of the people you invited, well some of them. You know who you invited! Brendon Pinola Photography offers a great alternative! The custom photo sign-in album seamlessly incorporates your photos with beautiful colors and textures to give your guests a chance to see your awesome photos when they arrive. Instead of a simple line to sign their name on, there is plenty of open space on each page in the album for them to write you a short note (remember your high-school yearbook?). The photo sign in album will be a treasured keepsake for you and something you will actually want to look at again and again. 

The album comes bound in leather with 24 pages and holds about 20 photos. The first page can hold your names and wedding date (or name of your event) along with a short message. The album it printed on special photo paper that will accept ink without smearing. We strongly recommend the Staedtler pigment liner for best results. The album itself comes in three sizes: 8x8" 10x10" and 12x12" (measured when album is closed) They provide room for approximately 100, 150 and 200 guests to sign in respectively. 

You do not have to be a client of Brendon Pinola Photography to have one of these albums made. All you need is 20 digital photos. 
• The photos need to be high-resolution. 2000 pixels long or higher is recommended. 
• All photos receive basic editing for the best printing results. Additional editing and "photoshopping" is available for a surcharge.

• The leather cover is available in 13 different colors. Leather covers can be stamped in gold or silver text
     • Black

     • Baby Blue
     • Camel
     • Cardinal Red
     • Chocolate
     •  Espresso
     • Hydrangea
     • Kiwi
     • Lavender 
     • Pink
     • Teal
     • White
     • Brown Velvet
     • A photo cover is also available for an additional fee


If you have any questions about the sign in album, use the contact section.


• 8x8" $250
• 10x10" $275
• 12x12" $300
• Stamping service $12
• Photo cover $35

 

FREE overnight shipping included!

To order your sign in album, click here, then click the "buy" button in the upper right corner. After payment, you'll receive a confirmation message with instructions on how to select the photos you'd like used if you are a client of Brendon Pinola Photography, or how to transfer to us if you are not.

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Wedding guestbook photo guestbook photo sign in book sign in album sign in book https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/7/the-photo-guestbook Tue, 23 Jul 2013 04:54:35 GMT
Learning Photography https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/7/learning-photography Learning Photography (ask me anything)

     If you just stumbled across this post, take your hands off the mouse, you found what you were looking for (unless you had a terrible typing mishap and were actually looking for photos of people leering or some craziness). I love teaching people the basics of photography and also more advanced methods of achieving the results they're looking for. Before I go into any of that though, the reason why this is exactly the right page for you if you're looking to learn is because I'm going to use this post as an interactive forum for anyone in the world to ask any question related to photography. Literally ask me anything about photography and I'll reply, no trade secrets here. Even if the content below is "below" you or if you're not ready for a "101" course in photography, feel free to let me know where you're at and what information would help you improve. If you live in the Birmingham, AL area I offer one-on-one lessons that will give you an opportunity to see the reasons why you haven't been able to get the results that you want in the past and also the solutions to getting better at your photography so that you can free up your mind to be more creative instead of always being frustrated that your camera is not cooperating with you. 

 

Know Thyself and Know Thy Camera

     One of the most interesting concepts I've discovered during my career is the relationship and distinction between a person's creative and technical ability and the abilities of their camera. A running wry joke among photographers is the situation where they are approached with gushing compliments by a bystander while shooting about their camera while offering no appreciation of the photographer's own abilities, as if to attribute credit for a great photo in the making to the machine that captured it instead of the artist who envisioned it. This type of thinking has played a big role in a recent shift the attention of camera companies from professionals to amateurs.  There are more beautiful photos being taken now than ever before, but so many people think that the only thing holding them back is their feeble camera, so they run out and spend more than they should for a fancier camera with more buttons only to find that their photos don't improve or actually get worse!! 


     There is an Venn diagram above that describes a person's net potential to create a beautiful photo and the technical ability of a given camera to carry out that person's intentions and "commands" as it were. Take a second and be honest with yourself. Is it more likely that your camera is holding you back from the photos that you could / should be capturing or is it more likely that your own know-how, experience and general abilities are holding the camera back from what it's capable of? It's a sliding scale, but everyone is somewhere between those circles. If your honesty needs a little perspective, consider this: some of the best photographers in world-history never had a camera as advanced as the one on your cell-phone, or the one on the cell phone you threw in a drawer five years ago. The fact that you immediately get visual confirmation of what you shot puts your camera in a different universe from those of Ansel Adams, Annie Leibovitz or Irving Penn, who created epic photos that any pro would be proud to call their own. The eventual conclusion of this line of reasoning is that if you take take two photographers, a rank amateur and a seasoned pro, and give the rookie a Canon 1Dx with a 24-70mm "L" lens (about $8,500 worth of top-end pro gear at the time of this writing) and give the professional photographer an old Holga (a cheap, plastic, essentially disposable camera with a lens having no zooming ability) 99 times out of 100 the pro will come out with a better photo of a given subject. If you're serious about creating better photos stop drooling over the newest cameras and lenses and start building your knowledge of how your current camera works and the fundamentals of how any camera takes light and transforms it into captured image. 
     One caveat that I will allow is that if your camera has no manual functions then it really is limiting your ability to control it, which will seriously impair your learning process. Most (if not all) cell phone and many P&S (point and shoot) compact cameras are fully automatic only, meaning that you point the camera at the scene and it uses whatever technology and programming it has to make decisions about the scene, adjust the parameters of how the photo is taken, and you get whatever result that produces. As "smart" as cameras are now, they're usually not close to accurate on these decisions and they're rarely dead-on. The key manual functions of a camera that allow you to capture a photo properly and with consistent accuracy are as follows.

 

The A,B,C's

 

Shutter speed - a shutter comes in multiple forms now, whether a physical shutter or simply an electronic signal but the function of it in any case is to control the duration of time that light is allowed to enter the camera and exposure either the frame of film or more likely the electronic image sensor that records that light as a photo image.  The speed is normally described as a fraction of a second. The longer the shutter stays open, more light enters the camera and the brighter the image will be. On professional cameras, the speed of the shutter can usually be adjustment anywhere from a blistering 1/8000th of a second all the way to 30 seconds or longer. Also, with any subject that is not perfectly stationary, any movement that occurs between when the shutter is opened and when it shuts will also be captured in a single frame. Any motion that is captured is registered as blur.  You'd be surprised how much motion can happen in a tiny fraction of a second, especially when you consider that if you're holding the camera in your hands, then any movement that you make on your end is translated into the scene that you see in the viewfinder as movement also. Any guesses as to what shutter speed you would need to capture a subject without any blur from this motion? Well it's a trick question because that setting can change depending on many factors, but you might be surprised to know that usually the shutter needs to as fast as 1/100th of a second or faster in order to eliminate visible blur from movement. I'm getting into complicated waters here, but the point is that the shutter speed is a very important setting and letting your camera decide for you what setting it should be at is a recipe for poor photos. Note in the examples below that 1/25th of a sec left me with very shaky results. Automatic and "program" settings may readily select 1/25th as your shutter speed and leave you to recognize that difficult setting and deal with the consequences. Often you can't see motion blur or camera shake on the small LCD screen. Cameras are getting smarter all the time, but they are no where near to being as capable as your own mind at knowing what your intentions are for a photo and what settings would be appropriate to accomplish those intentions.

 

 

Aperture - the aperture of the camera, or more accurately the camera's lens functions like the iris in your eye. It is a circular, or roughly circular opening that adjusts in size to create a larger or smaller opening through which light passes. The aperture setting describes the size of that opening has a great affect on the outcome of the photo also. The aperture setting is described by a common f/number as every lens and brand of lens is different. The aperture setting can range from an ultra-wide setting such as f/1.2 to a ultra-narrow setting such as f/22 or f/32. Light passes through the aperture before it reaches the shutter mechanism, so the more light it is let in by the size of the aperture, the more light hits the film or image sensor during the time the sensor is open. and the brighter the resulting photo will be. 
     A quick-minded person might ask "Why not just make one big opening and let all the light in? If the shutter can make the picture brighter or darker, why do you need another device to do the same thing?" Great question, person I just made up! In the same way that the shutter controls or freezes motion blur while it controls brightness, the aperture has a second function also. It controls something called Depth of Field (DOF). The camera lens focuses similar to how your eyes do, choosing a location at a certain distance to focus on and anything closer or farther becomes increasingly out of focus (OOF). Things that are at the exact distance from the lens that the lens is focused for are known as being on a "focal plane", which is spherical around the area the lens can view. The depth of field is a controlled measurement of how deep that plane is from front to back. When the aperture is very small, only a small amount of light comes through and the depth of the area where things are viewed in focus is very wide and much of what the camera sees will be in focus and sharp if your shutter is set correctly to freeze any motion. The wider the aperture, the more light comes through and the shallower that focal plane becomes and less of what you see will be in focus. For the beginner, this seems like the opposite of what you'd want. When the aperture is nice and wide where lots of light comes in for the shutter to work with, very little will be kept in focus, making it easy to miss your shot. When you make the depth of field nice and wide where everything will be in focus, very little light comes into the camera, make it hard to get the photo as bright as you'd like without a dangerously slow shutter speed. This is a huge problem that automatic settings of a camera cannot deal with effectively, which results in photos that are often too dark or too blurry or both. When a photo is too dark or too blurry or both you can either change your settings, or start blasting the scene with flash. I think we've all see plenty of photos where people look like a deer-in-the-headlights standing in the middle of a cave because of flash. 

     Notice the difference in the shots below (exposure was compensated for in-camera for consistent brightness across all images) Notice how the lower the f/number of the aperture used, the blurrier the background. A much slower shutter speed was needed for each shot to gather the same amount of light to the sensor with a smaller aperture.

ISO - once again this is a setting that primarily controls the brightness of the image and it's also very important. I list it thirdly mainly because its secondary effects are less noticeable than that of the shutter and aperture. On a film camera, the ISO setting is not really a setting at all, but rather a rating of the type of film you're using. The higher the rating of the film, the brighter it will render an image with a given set of camera settings. On digital cameras, you have a huge advantage in that you can change the ISO setting at any time without having to swap out rolls of film, and of course that you have dozens of different settings at hand. In the "old days", carrying a full supply of 20 different types of film would be ridiculous, so you did the best you could with what you brought. The way the ISO works in either case is that the higher the setting or rating, the more sensitive the film or image sensor is to light, so the same amount of light hitting the sensor would be more efficient it brightening the image the higher the ISO is set. The secondary effect of the ISO is something that has been intentionally minimized by better camera technology over time as it has less creative value then the blur control of the shutter or the depth of field control of the aperture. The higher you "bump" your ISO on a digital camera, the more the signal coming from the image sensor is electronically amplified and the higher the amplification level, the more "noise" is brought into the photo, especially in dark areas or areas with highly saturated colors. In film, this result is called grain and is a chemical result. Grain is normally better looking than noise and is one reason why so many people still love film while digital is clearly more user-friendly. The noise from a high-ISO image can also damage the damage the quality of the image in terms of its clarity, sharpness and the accuracy of the colors in the scene. This is one area where cameras have come along way recently and ISO levels that used to be unacceptable because of tremendous amounts of noise are now much more usable, although as a general rule, the lower you can set the ISO while still having the ability to control motion blur with usable shutter speeds and control depth of field with usable aperture settings the better. The examples below came from my Canon 5D Mark III which has phenominal capability to shoot cleanly at high ISO, and even it shows noticeable losses in quality at the high end. Chances are your camera isn't nearly as clean as these examples, and your automatic settings might happily let you shoot at the highest setting, forfeiting quality needlessly.

     Chances are, if all that info was new to you then you didn't absorb it all. It's definitely something you have to learn by doing and I won't lie, it doesn't always come like second nature to people, but I hope you realize the importance of these camera settings and that it's critical to have control over them. Most people don't take the time to learn how to use a camera with fully manual settings. Most people use some version of an automatic setting where the camera makes the judgement call about the appropriate brightness of the scene and then adjusts the cameras settings how it sees fit to achieve that exposure (brightness) level. Since true professionals typically use manual controls, the automatic settings normally are designed for use by amateurs and implement very "safe" settings that aim for sharp photos at the cost of accurate exposure and of course throw creative control out the window, which is exactly what most people are looking for when they buy the camera.  Auto modes are fine for cell phones. If you're using a cell phone to take a picture, I hope it wasn't a preconceived plan to take a beautiful photo to be printed and hung on the wall. While it's not impossible, it is highly unlikely to happen. Conclusion, if the camera you have or are looking to buy doesn't offer full manual control of these camera functions you'll want to look at other cameras in your price range that do. If it does have manual control, there will usually either be a big "M" icon on a mode dial somewhere on the camera, or in one of the primary menus if it's a smaller camera.
     

The Best Camera is the One You have with You

     Don't think that you have to go out and buy the best camera that your credit score will allow. I'll admit, that when it comes to camera gear and electronics in general that I'm usually of the opinion that it's best to buy something that will not only physically last without breaking, but also satisfy your personal needs, expectations and growing wants from it for a period of time that justifies the price tag. If you're new to photography and just want to find out if you have potential to really enjoy it, you probably don't need to spend $1,000+ on a camera that will be meant to last for years and take hundreds of thousands of photos under the harshest and most demanding conditions. Once you get you "chops" you'll find out where you are in the Venn diagram, how much the camera you have is holding back your personal ability, but most importantly how much your ability hinders the camera from delivering the images that it truly can, and that is where improvement happens. Remember, (honesty time) if you're frustrated with your camera and feel like saying "I just can't get good shots with that thing" just bring it to me and I'll set you straight. Not to be prideful, I just want everyone to realize that money can only buy so much and that as played-out as it sounds, beauty and creativity is something you develop inside yourself, not press a button for.
     With all that in mind, if you're just starting out, you probably aren't spending 8-12 hours a day on photography or things related to it. This is how I make my living, so I can justify hauling alot of gear with me anywhere I need it, but for you to get better, the camera itself can't be an inconvenience. Get something you can handle. Avoid the classic rookie mistake of buying cheap lenses immediately because the lens that comes with the camera is no good. One of the best tips I can give you is to immediately pick up a 50mm or 35mm prime lens. Virtually every camera company makes one, or an equivalent. You can read more about prime lenses and alot of other gear here, but the simple reason is that prime lenses are much smaller, lighter and simpler in design than zoom lenses because they have just a single focal length. This allows them to deliver much higher image quality and MOST IMPORTANTLY a much wider maximum aperture for the same price as a lower quality zoom lens with a narrow aperture.
     Take your camera anywhere you can. Your abilities will increase exponentially, but as with almost any worth-while endeavor, the beginning stages are the slowest. Once you master controlling the your manual settings you'll be able to free up your mind to be more and more creative and this is where you'll truly find the enjoyment and fulfillment that you hoped for. Once you can consistently produce technically sound and creative photographs, not just snapshots, you'll be at a place that you can actually use your skills to make money, if that's your aim. Just always remember to not do yourself and others a disservice by pretending to be something you're not. One good photo does not a photographer make, and being a PROFESSIONAL photographer doesn't just mean that you're charging a fee to take pictures. Professionalism has everything to do with how you carry yourself and behave.

 

Leave your Ego at Home

     I (used to) love to play the guitar. I was never all that good. I never had a real lesson. I taught myself what little I did know. Granted, I taught myself photography also and that turned out well, but music was clearly a different matter for me. I did love going to Guitar Center though, all the "axes" lined up and begging for me to hack out a barely-discernable cover of a song that no one wanted to hear, but I was able to work out tablature for at home. The only credit I can give myself is that I never went in there with the confidence then when I picked up a $2,000 Les Paul, I was about to play a tune worthy of such an instrument. If I had the cash to buy one and thought that I was then ready to start a band and get on the radio I would have been in for a very abrupt and rude awakening.
     Be honest with me and yourself one more time. Do you think that if you go up to anyone who is very good at ANYTHING and ask them, "Did you ever SUCK at what you do?" that most of them would say no?? Of course they did! Sure, there's always a prodigy somewhere like Tiger Woods sinking birdie putts at 6 years old, but most people who have "made it" and can put their pride aside will admit (like I do) that "yeah, I used to be pretty horrible. I'm ashamed to even look at what I used to be proud to call my work." Being lousy is the natural precusor of being not-lousy, don't deceive yourself into thinking that you're already good at this just because you don't want to admit to yourself or others that you're doing something that you're not good at. When you're shooting, avoid the thought that you "nailed it." Work with a pro, take lessons, be teachable. When you see someone point their camera at the same scene and get a better shot than you did, don't be ashamed that you were just shown-up, realize that right then, you have the opportunity to learn how to be better while skipping who-knows-how-many levels of trial and error. Hopefully one day you'll look back and realize that you were no where near as good as you thought you were, but only because you have reached a place where there is a clear improvement to compare to.

 

    If you skimmed the whole blog and missed it the first time I mentioned, I offer one-on-one and group lessons and workshops. I've trained numerous photographers of every different different skill level and I can definitely help you streamline your own growth in photography. Some people have the sticktoitiveness to hang in there for years until they get to a place that they actually enjoy and are proud of their work, but why wait longer than you have to? Don't do it on your own, contact me today and let me know what would move mountains for you.

 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

brendonpinolaphotography.com

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) how to use my camera learning photography photography workshop https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/7/learning-photography Fri, 12 Jul 2013 16:41:32 GMT
Tips from Brides https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/4/tips-from-brides-  

1. First and foremost, stay true to yourselves as a couple.

“We made the decision to elope and were scared of hurting our families; however, we weren’t going to be able to have the wedding that we wanted any other way. It was getting too big and out of hand otherwise. People might be disappointed if you choose to elope, but they’ll also understand. Take the pressure off yourself, no one else is going to notice so-called ‘imperfections.’ The most important thing is who is standing up there at the altar with you, pledging their life and love to you.” — Celeste and Cristian
Jenn & Alex

2. Embrace the challenge of staying on budget.

“Before we made any plans for the wedding, we sat down and discussed what was most important to us, what wan’t a priority and what we might be able to do ourselves. Scott is very creative, so we designed our invites and had them printed at a fraction of the cost of what it may have been otherwise. The decorations were pretty much all DIY (thanks to enlisted friends and family!)…we also saved around $7,000 (or 80 percent) off the standard prices of our flights and accommodations for our honeymoon by doing extensive research. That was a very proud moment for us!
 
We learned that it was entirely achievable to have a beautiful and special wedding without blowing the bank and having a really long engagement. We probably spent $15,000 at the most, and we only had a five-month engagement, without having prepared a thing before that. It wasn’t easy…I joke that I should put my wedding planning on my résumé because it was such an achievement!” — Libby and Scott

3. Select vendors that you trust.

“Enjoy the lead-up to your wedding and don’t try to over-plan! Research your vendors and make sure you choose those that suit your personal style.” — Kobi and Brad
 

4. Just roll with it.

“Don’t get caught up in all of the ‘shoulds’ and ‘musts’ — just do whatever feels right for you and your beau. Don’t sweat the things you can’t control…you’ll be glowing with such energy on that day that nothing will touch you, anyway. And if you’re planning on DIY? Start early. I cannot emphasize that enough!” — Holly and Cory


5. Extend that blissful just-married feeling indefinitely.

“Don’t waste time being stressed before the wedding day. The only thing that matters in the end is that you both love each other and are committing your life to one another…also, after the wedding is over and you resume your everyday life, continue putting in as much effort as you both did to win each other over. It keeps the love alive!” — Jess and Matt
 
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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Wedding Tips https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/4/tips-from-brides- Wed, 24 Apr 2013 00:01:02 GMT
Brittany's Bridal Portraits https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/4/brittanys-bridal-portraits

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Birmingham Botanical Gardens Bridal Session https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/4/brittanys-bridal-portraits Sun, 14 Apr 2013 23:58:48 GMT
Amanda & Kelsey https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/4/amanda-kelsey Amanda and Kelsey had their engagement photos in Old Town Helena. 

 

Amanda & Kelsey

Amanda & Kelsey

Amanda & Kelsey

Amanda & Kelsey Amanda & Kelsey

Amanda & Kelsey

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist |  Storyteller

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) amanda and kelsey engagement session old town helena engagement session https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/4/amanda-kelsey Sun, 14 Apr 2013 22:38:19 GMT
Jenn & Alex Engagements (sneak peak) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/4/jenn-alex-engagements-sneak-peak

 

 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the aricle in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

 

 

 

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Auburn engagement auburn university engagement photos https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/4/jenn-alex-engagements-sneak-peak Tue, 02 Apr 2013 03:46:50 GMT
Military discounts on wedding photography https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/3/military-discount Military Discount

En Garde! Service men and woman can take advantage of a 5% discount on any package. 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) military discount military discount on photography wedding photography in birmingham, AL https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/3/military-discount Tue, 26 Mar 2013 03:11:22 GMT
Should I do a first look? https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/3/first-look To See or not to See?

          If you found this page by searching specifically for "first look" in Google, then you probably already know that in the last 4-5 years it's become an increasingly common practice for a bride and groom to meet and see each other on the wedding day before the actual ceremony. This is a very polarizing concept. Most couples that I meet with feel strongly about this one way or the other, but often their position (whether they are for or against the first look!!) is based on faulty information or negative past experience.

          I absolutely have to preface this weighing of options by mentioning that whether I'm talking to a prospective client, a bride that I'm already working with or dealing with it in a more public forum like this, I never pressure anyone to have a first look moment as opposed to the more traditional process of keeping the bride and groom separated all day until she walks down the aisle, or however the ceremony begins in a different culture. The moment when a groom sees his bride for the first time is arguably the most special moment of the most special day of the couple's lives, and it can't be thrown around lightly. Once you understand the difference between the first look and the traditional "waiting" you should definitely choose the route that feels the best to you, but don't decide against it because your mom doesn't like the idea and don't decide in favor of it because the word "traditional" means "boring" to you. (Moms, if you're reading this don't hate!) Trust me both methods can be completely wonderful, memorable, special and respectful IF you understand the differences and make the choice that's best for you.

The Tradition

 

          The traditional protestant wedding ceremony begins with the bride being escorted by her father (or other man with a protective role in her life) into the area where the ceremony will take place and then he presents her the groom, symbolizing a transferring of responsibility and guardianship from the father to the groom. In other cultures, for instance Jewish weddings, the entire family presents the spouses to each other. No matter what your family dynamics are, this milestone in a couple's separate lives, about to be joined, does have a world of significance and these ceremonial practices help to brings that significance to the forefront of the mind and heart.

  • While this doesn't really have a direct relationship to whether or not the bride groom have seen each other, it's easy to feel that once and bride and groom are united on their wedding day that those feelings of oneness have taken hold and parents may understandably want to be a part of that "unveiling."
  • This is a very special moment, not something to be left unplanned like a trip to the grocery store.
  • Wedding guests and the bridal party have taken out time and many have spent money to be with you and celebrate this union which culminates in this moment. Do you want to leave them out of this moment?
  • While pictures can be taken beforehand, the pictures of the bride and groom together on their wedding are are ultimately why a photographer was hired, possibly at a premium and not much time will be available between the ceremony and reception.  Of course many memories throughout the day are there to be captured in a photo, but how many are as important as the time the bride and groom spend together on this day? 
  • With the advent of social media, magazines and wedding websites and blogs, girls have access to see thousands of wedding ideas in a short amount of time, many of which they will want to incorporate into their own wedding. Expectations quickly grow. While the guests will only be there for a few hours, the wedding is literally a full day now. Many photos of candid situations will be captured "in the moment," but there can be hours of posed pictures that go into recording the day as thoroughly as has become the standard. If the bride and groom take all their pictures together after the ceremony there has to be a decision as to the balance of importance between capturing those moments and rejoining the guests for the reception.
  • We've all heard of the cocktail hour, but if dinner is being served there is also that consideration.
  • As the photographer, I welcome the challenge to deliver everything a bride could hope for, BUT photographing weddings is what I do nearly every weekend (i.e. I can handle it better than you can). In all likelihood this is your first time getting married. What are the chances that you will be able to experience one of the most emotion times of your life and then immediately undertake the task of organizing dozens of people and being posed into as many pictures as would normally be taken in 2-3 hours in 45 minutes or less. I can probably pull it off, but I doubt you can, and I absolutely guarantee that you won't feel as "swept up in romance" as I will try to make you look in the photos. Usually an abbreviated version of coverage will be used. 
  • If you agree that this will be one of the most important moments on the the most important day of your life, at least consider how you feel about the fact that virtually everyone you're close to will be sitting there starring at you when it happens. Will that stress you out, or heighten the feeling of shared love? Do you tend to get queasy (or clumsy) under pressure?

Do you have to sacrifice all the wonderful photos you had pinned and clipped and bookmarked in order to have a meaningful and special moment of coming together as spouses and families??

 

 

 

The Alternative

           Ok, so I've pretty much went back on my word and gradually pressured you into seeing your fiance before the ceremony right? Come on, give me a little credit. I would at least go back and take that sentence out if I were going to muscle you into it :-).  No matter what you decide to do I will always strive to reduce stress on the wedding day by taking every photo that can possibly be taken before the ceremony so that if anything must be left until afterward no one will lose their mind. As I've stated numerous times throughout 

my website and have said like a mantra in consultations and during wedding planning, "happy people make happy pictures." Preserving a low-stress atmosphere is critical, and the wedding day is stressful enough by nature without trying to hold yourself to a strict and busy schedule. I estimate that over 50% of couples now decide to make all their normal wedding day preparations and then see each other before the ceremony, allowing for most or all of their pictures to be taken and for the ceremony to flow seamlessly into the reception with little or no delay. If you're considering a first look moment consider the following.
  • The first look can and should still be special.
  • Embrace the fact that it's not traditional. Plan for it to be private and intimate instead of having the fanfare, onlookers and sea of iPhones and camcorders.
  • The scheduling of the wedding day, especially with regard to photography will be significantly different. When a first look is used, I recommend that photo coverage start 4 hours prior to the ceremony to allow time for any and everything to be photographed without the pressure of the ticking clock and the arrival of guests that you still want to be hidden from until the ceremony. I normally try to have all pictures wrapped up 30-45 minutes prior to the ceremony so the bride can be hidden and simply so everyone can relax and regroup, especially in the hotter months.
  • The first look allows much more time to be dedicated to the bride and groom's pictures together. Your wedding venue probably has dozens of picturesque locations, but in the brief time between the ceremony and reception you'll probably only have time to use one or two of them.  
  • Generally speaking, your guests will be none the wiser. The ceremony still takes place the same way, but they will be pleasantly surprised when they don't have an hour to kill trying to avoid making eye contact with the extended family member that they got into a fight with at the last wedding
  • Myself and any second shooter that may be with me stay at a respectful distance during the first look and shoot with zoom lenses so that relatively privacy can be had and the bride and groom can feel free to say or feel whatever seems right.
  • All the previous information may not be new to you, but this next bit might be an original concept for you: If the family aspect of the traditional ceremony is of top priority to you, your family can be involved in the first look. Just imaging the purity of the moment and the power of the emotion to have your dad (or even both your parents) escort you to a private alcove where your future husband is waiting for you. As much as I appreciate the convenience that the first look provides and the amazing photographs that can result, I highly recommend making the first look your own instead of simply resigning yourself to the fact that you're taking an "alternative route."

If you have any input from past experience, fears or concerns in anticipation, or even confusion at how this all works please feel free to leave a comment on this post or send me an email directly.

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the article in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) first glace first look wedding ceremony https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/3/first-look Thu, 07 Mar 2013 00:50:55 GMT
Listings https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/3/listings Brendon Pinola Photography is now featured on the following listings and directories

photographydirectoryproject.com,

 

 

   Wedding directory resources and the best of wedding sites
Wedding Directory

 

 

Wedding Directory

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/3/listings Tue, 05 Mar 2013 18:37:54 GMT
Birmingham Fashion Week 2013 https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/3/bfw2013 I had the opportunity to be in the "press pit" at the Birmingham Fashion Week on Saturday for the grand finale. The highlight of the evening were new designs from Amy Smilovic's Tibi and Heidi Elnora, and also some really entertaining designs from local "up and coming designers" even young people as young as 11 years old!! It was a great experience and I got some really provocative shots shots. I also have an even higher respect now for make up artists, hair stylists and of course models. When you send someone down the runway looking as good and confident as these girls (and guys) were, it's like a gift-wrapped photo op...sometimes literally.

 The photos are featured on ClearChannel websites 103.7, 102.5, 103.1, werc, Magic96 and 104.1!!

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the aricle in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the aricle in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Birmingham Fashion Week 2013 https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/3/bfw2013 Mon, 04 Mar 2013 21:32:46 GMT
Wedding Wire Bride's Choice Award https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/wedding-wire-brides-choice-award I'm pumped to again be named a Wedding Wire Bride's Choice for 2013!

Weddings, Wedding VenuesBrendon Pinola Photography, Best Wedding Photographers in Birmingham, Huntsville, Tuscaloosa - 2013 Bride's Choice Award Winner
 

Check out the reviews from my awesome brides from 2012!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/wedding-wire-brides-choice-award Thu, 28 Feb 2013 15:36:00 GMT
Annabella at Cedar Glen https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/annabella-at-cedar-glen  

(CAUTION)

This slideshow has soft background music. If you're viewing this where music is not appropriate, you might use the slideshow menu to turn the volume down

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

 

 

Annabella @ Cedar Glenn (Huntsville) 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) annabella at cedar glen annabella weddings https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/annabella-at-cedar-glen Thu, 28 Feb 2013 00:36:39 GMT
Alley Station | Brendon Pinola Photography https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/alley-station  

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Alley Station (Montgomery)

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) alley station first baptist montgomery reception venue in Montgomery https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/alley-station Wed, 27 Feb 2013 03:05:25 GMT
The Alabama Theater | Birmingham Photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/dawson-memorial-baptist-the-alabama-theater  

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Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

 

 

 

Dawson memorial
Alabama Theater

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Alabama Theater Dawson Memorial Baptist Church Homewood, AL https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/dawson-memorial-baptist-the-alabama-theater Tue, 26 Feb 2013 20:02:48 GMT
Autumn Ridge https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/autumn-ridge  

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Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

 

 

Autumn Ridge

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Autumn Ridge Autumn Ridge weddings chelsea al https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/autumn-ridge Tue, 26 Feb 2013 19:16:01 GMT
The Sonnet House https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/the-sonnet-house (CAUTION)

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Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

 

 

 

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) The Sonnet House The Sonnet House, Birmingham https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/the-sonnet-house Tue, 26 Feb 2013 18:52:27 GMT
Equipment Every Wedding Photographer should have https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/equipment-every-wedding-photographer-should-have I keep a pretty close eye on the analytics of my website (tracking for how many people visit my website, from where they were referred, and what web searches they used to find it) and I've noticed almost once a day someone searched for "Equipment every wedding photographer should have" (if you just searched for that and found this, you're welcome :-)

I shoot practically any type of photography, but I do shoot many weddings, so here's a list of what gear I normally bring to a wedding, what I use each thing for, which is the most important, the basic advantages and disadvantages of an item, some advice for those looking at something in a specific range of gear and why I have chosen to use what I do, maybe I'll even add a "wish list" :-D Enjoy, and feel free to post comments or send me questions. Rather than explain every little technical term I'll just link certain things that some people may not be familiar with. I'll also link to reviews and descriptions of gear where I can. This post will be limited to the cameras, lenses and memory cards I use. Lighting equipment and other accessories will be discussed in another post.

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Equipment Every Wedding Photographer should have https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/equipment-every-wedding-photographer-should-have Sun, 24 Feb 2013 23:29:37 GMT
Drops of Saturn https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/drops-of-saturn I've really been itching to try this again after one abysmal failure of an attempt early this year and I think I nailed it this time! There is nothing in the water, it is 100% tap water in a ordinary frying pan on my kitchen table. The colors have not been simulated or manipulated (beyond normal curves and levels adjustments in post) Enjoy

~Brendon

SEE THE WHOLE GALLERY HERE!

 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

Photographer | Wizard of Water

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) how to shoot water droplets https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/drops-of-saturn Mon, 18 Feb 2013 03:41:04 GMT
BMAN's Epic Mac & Cheese https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/bmans-epic-mac-cheese

 

 

If you're a fan of easy to make dishes that everyone likes but get tired of the same old boring flavor, check this out! I usually have about 20-30 minutes to prepare dinner, so for this I keep the main process as simple as it gets, it's the seasoning that makes the difference! 

 

  • If you are used to making home-made mac and cheese you can start with that base dish, but for the purposes of whipping this up in 10 minutes or less, I start with a box of you-guessed-it, Kraft Cheese and Macaroni. Though the original style is clearly the best, white cheddar works best for this. If you have more time than I do, I suggest throwing out the elbow pasta in the box and boiling a medium penne or shells for 8 minutes or to your liking. (The texture of these types of pasta holds sauce alot better than smooth elbows) I boil the pasta in 1/2 tsp of parsley and 1/2 tsp kosher salt.
  • Drain the cooked pasta as usual, return pasta to pot, add the 1/4 cup of milk and 4 tbs of butter, still business as usual, pour in the "cheese" mixture, and THEN things get interesting.
  • Stir in one tablespoon of dijon mustard and then hit the pot with 4-5 shakes (about 1/2 tsp) of Tabasco.
  • Add 1/2 tsp of Chili 3000 (ancho chili powder, garlic, cumin, onion, cilantro, paprika, cayenne pepper, lemon peel, mexican oregano, black pepper, citric acid, natural smoke flavor, jalapeno pepper)
  • Add 1 tsp of Worcestershire sauce
  • Add 1 tsp white vinegar
  • Serve with grated Vermont extra sharp white cheddar over the top and you're done! 
  • Bonus points: If you have the time, pour the final mixture into a small casserole dish and then top with the grated cheese and some panko and bake at 400º for 10-15 minutes or to desired level of crustacean-ness. 

 

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) epic mac and cheese https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/bmans-epic-mac-cheese Sat, 16 Feb 2013 00:47:12 GMT
Joy & Doug Engagement Session https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/joy-doug-engagement-session For those of you outside Alabama, it's being raining about 5 days a week for the last 6 weeks or so. When the time came around for Joy and Doug's engagement session in Tuscaloosa, it rained all morning and even when it let up, a 20% forecast wasn't very comforting as the skies were still very threatening. For photographers, overcast lighting can be very helpful because it makes the light uniform everywhere so you don't have to worry about working around or in harsh sunlight. But sure enough, not five minutes after the couple showed up the skies peeled back and we had a near-cloudless sky for the rest of the evening. Great for spirits, but my whole workflow plan went out the window! Luckily, we were able to adjust on the fly pretty well and find new locations to replace ones that suddenly were unappealing in direct sunlight. Joy and Doug were super laid back and even better, were very comfortable being themselves with each other in front of the camera, and the result of their feelings speak for themselves. Can't wait until the wedding!

 Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

Wedding Photographer | Story Teller

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Engagement Session in Tuscaloosa Northport AL https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/2/joy-doug-engagement-session Mon, 11 Feb 2013 03:29:07 GMT
Chicago Revisited (4) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/chicago-revisited-4 Laura and I visited Chicago last April and like so many things that I do that aren't wedding or job-related, I haven't had the time to dedicate as much attention and effort to processing the photographs I took from the trip as I would like to...until now. There's definitely several more gems than I initially uncovered in my first pass last year. The full gallery is in the fine art section of the website.

 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

Wedding Photographer

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Chicago photos https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/chicago-revisited-4 Fri, 25 Jan 2013 02:48:39 GMT
Chicago revisited (3) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/chicago-revisited-3 Laura and I visited Chicago last April and like so many things that I do that aren't wedding or job-related, I haven't had the time to dedicate as much attention and effort to processing the photographs I took from the trip as I would like to...until now. There's definitely several more gems than I initially uncovered in my first pass last year. The full gallery is in the fine art section of the website.

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) photos of Chicago https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/chicago-revisited-3 Fri, 25 Jan 2013 01:33:28 GMT
Brendon Pinola Photography has been named a TheKnot.com Best of Weddings Winner https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/best-of-weddings

 

 

 

Weddings, Wedding VenuesBrendon Pinola Photography, Best Wedding Photographers in Birmingham, Huntsville, Tuscaloosa - 2013 Bride's Choice Award Winner
 

 

We're once again honored to be named among theknot's Best of Weddings and WeddingWire's  Bride's Choice for 2013! 

 

 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

Wedding Photographer

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) theknot.com best of weddings https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/best-of-weddings Thu, 24 Jan 2013 02:37:09 GMT
Chicago revisted (2) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/chicago-revisted-2 Laura and I visited Chicago last April and like so many things that I do that aren't wedding or job-related, I haven't had the time to dedicate as much attention and effort to processing the photographs I took from the trip as I would like to...until now. There's definitely several more gems than I initially uncovered in my first pass last year. The full gallery is in the fine art section of the website.

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Chicago photos https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/chicago-revisted-2 Mon, 21 Jan 2013 23:33:46 GMT
Chicago revisted (1) https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/chicago-revisted Laura and I visited Chicago last April and like so many things that I do that aren't wedding or job-related, I haven't had the time to dedicate as much attention and effort to processing the photographs I took from the trip as I would like to...until now. There's definitely several more gems than I initially uncovered in my first pass last year. The full gallery is in the fine art section of the website.

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Photos of Chicago https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/chicago-revisted Mon, 21 Jan 2013 22:45:21 GMT
Ninety Minutes on Deerfoot https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/ninety-minutes-on-deerfoot

I've been beating myself up for like, years now that every time I'm the car and see something awesome in the spur of the moment I'm unprepared, i.e. no camera! Yeah iPhones are amazing and all that, but there's no control, no zoom and I just don't like the results of anything beyond snapshots of facebook-type stuff. I'm still planning on getting a four-thirds format camera that shoots in RAW and has decent glass on it, but in the meantime I at least put my (wife's) Canon HS550 point and shoot in my glovebox, and sure enough, less than a week later we get the first real genuine snowfall I've seen since I left Massachusetts. I was working about 5 minutes from home when it started snowing, and it came down fast. By the time I left to head home people were sliding all over the place, driving in the wrong lane, spinning around sideways and generally panicking. Luckily my friend and I were in his 4wd and we rode right past all the chaos, but when I hit Deerfoot Parkway, the main road leading from the interstate to my neighborhood, it was a parking lot for about 4 miles. In the end, it took me over 3 hours to get home that day, but as I sat in my car listening to Miike Snow (no lie, and not because of his name, just an epic album), I got to see things that I've driven by hundreds of times at 60 miles and hour and never had time to even glance at, now covered in snow and right as the sun was going down. At 0.0005 miles an hour you definitely have time to consider your surroundings and the afternoon wasn't a total loss.

Incidentally, if you haven't experienced a good heavy snow storm, or maybe just haven't noticed, the time right after the storm passes is almost always the most beautiful weather as far as a awesome blue sunny sky, the bright light reflecting off the white surfaces everywhere and making everything a photographer's lighting dream.

~Brendon

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Snowstorm Thomas Kinkade eat your heart out landscape https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/ninety-minutes-on-deerfoot Sat, 19 Jan 2013 16:30:20 GMT
"What are the advantages of hiring a professional?" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/advantages-of-hiring-a-professional  

 

"What are the advantages of hiring a 

professional wedding photographer as 

opposed to having a friend or family

member take the pictures?"

         

 

 

         In the ever-changing market of wedding photography, where everybody with an iPhone or consumer-grade camera feels that the only thing separating them from the "big boys" is a catchy brand name for their flavor of photography, the advantages of hiring a true professional seem to be more unclear than ever. In reality, the advantages of hiring a professional wedding photographer are not any more complicated than with any other professional.

         A Professional photographer is a person who, first and foremost, dedicates himself to photography as a full-time profession and craft. Particularly in the realm of wedding photography, the responsibility of the photographer is to be precise in creating photographs properly, under any circumstances and usually on the first attempt. There's no TiVo for life, no pause button and no rewind. If you miss a beautiful moment, you can't ask people to reenact it. Moreover, these moments rarely occur in a time or place where lighting and surroundings are optimal and it takes a mountain of experience and knowledge to handle any given situation at the drop of a hat. Many photographers can create stunning pictures in an open field under perfect lighting conditions but what if you aren't getting married in a field? What if you'll be spending the day in a poorly (or "intimately") lit chapel?

          In short, a professional photographer has the experience to handle any situation that is thrown at him and still produce excellent results. A professional isn't going to come to you weeks or months after the wedding and explain that the reason the pictures of the expression on your spouse’s face the first they saw you coming down the aisle are blurry, out of focus and underexposed is because you picked a church that was too dark.

          A thought about the word ‘Professional’ itself. When we think professional in terms of a photographer, we immediately think they do it for a living, not just as a hobby, but also think in terms of any other field. Professional also means businesslike. Being a professional means that you conform to the standards of not only skill and competence, but character. Whenever you hear someone saying "that's very unprofessional," they're not usually referring to how well someone does their job. They're usually making a comment about their behavior. Perhaps the biggest advantage to hiring a true Professional is that they will act like a professional.

Brides need to be aware there is always someone looking to create a niche for mediocrity and the perceived value of different services can be difficult to balance with actual value.

          The price of photography services, like any other art-based service, is usually not based on the cost to the artist but on an arbitrary value and often the price of something can subtly affect the perceived value. In other words, take a great product and start selling it for 75% off and people will start thinking less of it, simply because it's cheaper and is on the shelf with lower quality products. Take a low-quality product and triple the price and gradually people will think more of it because it’s now comparable to something of higher value. Of course Buyer's Remorse always sets the scales back to zero. After you forget how much you paid, you have a clearer picture of the value the item as it actually feels to you personally.

          In reference to our topic here, you can't judge a photographer strictly by their price and there isn't any magic dollar amount that certifies that you've hired a professional. Unfortunately, most brides base their search for a photographer almost completely on price. Two common methods of selecting a photographer (or other vendor) are the following.

  • You set a budget and then look for the photographer that offers the most value for that price (in the form of wedding coverage, additional sessions, albums and prints, etc)
  • You predetermine what you want in a wedding package and then look for the cheapest price that meets those requirements. 

          Because of the fickle nature of pricing within the industry, neither method addresses the problem of actual value vs. perceived value and, unfortunately, Buyer's Remorse will be more of a cruel reminder than a lesson learned since most people only get married once.

To quote a brilliant colleague of mine - "[during a consultation] We always politely ask...'Are you making your decision solely based on price?'  I then remind them that we work very hard on our craft to be considered one of the best in our field. We never had dreams of one day becoming the cheapest photographers in the world.'" Another local pro I know adds "competition based on price alone is ALWAYS a race to the bottom."

          Photographers whose prices perfectly match what you expect to spend may not be the best match for you. The advantages of hiring a professional cannot be expressed simply by saying "If you pay a lot, you'll get what you want." The chemistry between you and your photographer is the key. Assuming all the criteria mentioned above are met, the compatibility of the couple and the photographer and that person's style of photography, (the pictures themselves and how they are captured) may be a thing that gives the client the strongest advantage in the end of getting pictures they’ll treasure and will help preserve the memories of their happiest moments.

So here's the formula:

          First go to theknot.com, WeddingWire.com, bridal magazines, where ever you can find a directory of the pros in your area. Most of them will not have pricing right out in the open, so browse websites and make a list of the ones that have photography that you fall in love with. With that list, whether you made it a list of the top ten most expensive photogs or a mixed bag, at least you know that you love everything on the list. NOW, amidst that group of photographers start to make inquiries, get basic prices and then meet with the ones who are basically within your budget, seem to fit your personality and the tone of your wedding day. Don't immediately rule out someone if they're prices scare you. Many of them will be willing to customize a package to make it work within your budget*** Make sure they have the experience necessary to handle the challenges your wedding day may pose and have the tools and equipment necessary to enable full use of all their creative and technical skill. Judge whether they carry themselves in a professional manner and you will have made a great choice!

 

***This one tip is "worth the price of admission."

Spend. Money. On. Wedding. Coverage.

If you're on a budget, don't get your mind set that you have to have a wedding album, parent albums, 3 canvases a slew of prints and several extra sessions and a second shooter. You may work yourself into a corner where you're paying for 5 hours of wedding coverage, in which time you'll be stressed out trying to get all your pictures done and still get married, your photographer will have to make judgement calls on what he/she has time to do and what must be left out, and in the end, that gorgous album you spent half your budget on won't be even half full of pictures that you truly love. You have the rest of your life to have it all. The only thing you must be sure to get right is the wedding day. No Pressure, but if you make finding the right professional for your wedding day your top priority, you will have the right foundation to have photographs that you will cherish for a lifetime.

 

 

 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the aricle in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) professional photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/advantages-of-hiring-a-professional Thu, 17 Jan 2013 03:26:11 GMT
Hire a Professional! https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/hire-a-professional
Immortalize the Joy of Your Wedding by

Hiring a Professional Wedding Photographer

Weddings are truly enchanting events where the joy of a couple's special bond is celebrated and 
enriched by the presence of their closest friends and family members. The importance of capturing 
the most memorable moments of such a symbolic and beautiful day should, therefore, be treated 
accordingly.
 
Nowadays, as technology has started evolving exponentially with high resolution digital cameras, 
smartphones and camcorders present everywhere you turn, the importance of hiring a 
professional photographer to skillfully immortalize the most meaningful aspects of a wedding day 
celebration seems to have taken a back seat.
 
Photography has been, and always will remain, an art. However it would be a pity not to benefit 
from the skills of the best professional photographers simply because of money or comfort issues. 
 
Despite what most people would believe, booking a photographer is not that expensive. Prices can 
vary depending on the wedding package you are looking for. Nevertheless, you will find that some 
of the best professional photographers may offer their services at an affordable price. In some 
cases, this is true even if you need them for events that may differ from the mainstream, 
traditional style associated with most weddings.
 
Based in Birmingham, Alabama, Brendon Pinola Photography represents one of the best options 
for a viable wedding photojournalism resource. With their help, photography truly comes alive. 
They focus on capturing the incredible array of emotions hidden throughout the numerous special 
moments experienced during a wedding.
The passion that these experts apply to all their photographs will allow you to enjoy the most 
essential moments of your wedding - almost like a beautiful story, told by the light and colorful 
emphasis of each individual picture.
 
 
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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Professional photographer hire a photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/hire-a-professional Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:38:56 GMT
“Is it better to book a wedding photographer who uses film or digital equipment?” https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/film-or-digital

 

 

“Is it better to book a wedding photographer who uses film or digital equipment?”

        

 

          Unless you have mucho dinero to spend on your wedding photography, a photographer who uses digital equipment is probably the best option. There are still some "boutique" photographers who shoot in film, but the level of experience to pull off photographs that are consistently as good those produced by pro digital gear (without ever having the benefit of reviewing your images on a LCD) is something they place a high premium on. For the sake of argument, there is some great value to film, as it tends to have a much more organic feel to it than digital and many people find it much more appealing, just as some musicians insist on using a fully analog signal in their instruments and microphones. The texture is the goal with film. However, using film on a high level is an extremely high-end service and few can afford a film photographer that will produce the results the industry has come to expect.

 

 

 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the aricle in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Digital wedding photos Wedding photography Weddings on film https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/film-or-digital Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:38:46 GMT
"Why Do Photographers Copyright their photos?" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/copyrights

 

“Why do wedding photographers copyright the pictures they take at weddings?”

 

 

 

          Legally speaking, the person who takes a photograph owns all the rights to the reproduction (and digital dissemination) of them. Traditionally (and especially in the olden days of film) photographers retained these rights fully, since the client would rarely have any access to having professional prints made and the photographer who shot your photographs would personally handle the production of all your prints. Most photographers spent as much time in a dark room developing as modern photographers do in front of their computers editing in programs such as Lightroom and Photoshop.

          As the field has evolved, people have more access to print labs and the ability to make prints on their own, at a fraction of the price a professional photographer would charge to have a print or an enlargement made. All you need is the original digital files and you can make all the prints you want. As an awareness of this "loophole" has been spread, the demand for this concession has become nearly universal. Most photographers (myself included) now include a disc of fully edited images with every session we shoot. However, there is still a concern to be voiced that once a bride has those images, she's free to do anything with them, including things that would not be advisable by, or respectful to, the artist who created them. Re-editing the images is always frowned upon. If you have proficiency in Photoshop and can enhance your  photographs to your liking in a way that is tasteful, your photographer may overlook it when you post them on Facebook, but this is rarely the case. 

          The availability of one-stop kiosks at Wal-Mart, Walgreens and other places seem to be the most popular outlets for having digital files printed and the educated, discerning photographer also frowns on this. Knowing that a client will most likely ruin a photograph with ham-fisted editing and low-quality printing leads some photographers to still hold sole possession of the copyrights to their images, insisting that if the bride wants prints made, they must accept that the artistic integrity of the photographs has to be respected and therefore the processing must also be handled in a professional manner. 

          I stand on what I think is the middle ground. I understand the merit of saving money on my client's end but I also treasure the time and effort I put into getting her photographs to look exactly as they are, so I take modest steps to educate my brides on the best way to care for their images and have them reproduced in a method worthy of their investment. 

 

 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the aricle in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) print release printing wedding photos wedding photo copyrights wedding photography https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/copyrights Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:38:41 GMT
“What is proofing?" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/proofing

 

 

“What is a proof and what are the advantages of the different types of proofing?”

 

 

          Proofing is the process of posting the photographs we shoot on the internet for the purposes of easy viewing, especially useful in a situation where friends or family who were not able to attend the wedding would like to see the pictures. Proofing galleries generally have integrated shopping carts where prints can be ordered directly, even if the print-released images have already been delivered. Though the bride may save some money by using the print lab of her choice, it's nice to be able to offer anyone access to your images without having to lift a finger to make it possible. The images are typically watermarked with a tagline or logo to prevent people from illegally "right clicking" and saving our images to their computer to do who-knows-what with them later. The chief concern here is having imposters use our images to represent their supposed talent. 

 

 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the aricle in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) wedding photo proofing wedding photography https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/proofing Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:38:32 GMT
"Do I need a Second Shooter?" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/second-shooters  

 

"What are the pros and cons of hiring two wedding photographers instead of one?"

 

          In a consultation, I normally pose one question to a bride to help her determine if the logistics of her wedding day warrant the use of two photographers. "Are you and your fiancé planning on seeing each other before the ceremony and having all your pictures together with your family and wedding party taken to eliminate the delay between the ceremony and reception?" 
 
          This is a common practice now for several reasons. It allows photographs to often be taken during a time of the day when good lighting is available, whereas it would be dark out after the ceremony.  It allows the wedding day to proceed in a lower-stress manner, since the pictures of the bride and groom together do not take place in the hectic moments after the ceremony, when everyone is waiting for the reception to begin and dinner to be served. Lastly, it allows the moment when the groom sees his bride in her full glory to be a private and intimate moment just between the two of them, without their entire world of friends and family starring at them as it happens. Of course,  they will still see each other at the ceremony in the heat of the moment but seeing each other 
beforehand can settle a lot of nerves.  
 
          If the bride and groom are going to see each other beforehand, then generally speaking, they will be together for most of the day and most of the action will be centered in one location, and one photographer can more easily cover the events than if the bride and groom were going to be separated in two areas or locations all day up until the ceremony. Having two photographers fulfills 
the need to be in two places at once and also offers the general benefit of having safety by way of redundancy. More angles of the same action can be captured, fewer moments missed and, of course, each photographer has their own creative eye and different artistic take on a given subject. Finally, having two photographers means that one photographer can focus on posing a group of people or capturing a scene or detail shot, while the other photographer assists in organizing the crowd, holding a flash or reflector to improve the lighting, etc.
 
 

 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the aricle in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) second shooter wedding photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/second-shooters Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:38:14 GMT
"What are my wedding package options?" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-wedding-package
"What types of wedding packages do photographers typically offer?"
     
   The package(s) photographers offer vary greatly. Perhaps most common is a number of combinations of services and products that 
varies from a base package including an abbreviated wedding coverage for a starting price. Sometimes, a disc of images is included, sometime it is available for an additional fee, as are supplementary sessions (Engagement, Bridal, Post-Bridal, Trash-the-Dress, etc) print bundles and of course a wide assortment of professionally designed and printed albums and other printed products. Sometimes, by booking a package that bundles more features, you can get a better overall price than if you picked items individually and customized a 
package. Most often wedding albums will cost more if purchased "a la carte" after the wedding than if bundled with a package.
 
          Another group of photographers hold to the ideal that "shoot & burn" is an unacceptable mistreatment of their art and craft and leaving it to the bride's volition and capability to preserve her memories in a tangible and long-lasting form is irresponsible to her and to themselves. These tend to shy away from offering a "base package" at which their services can be secured for a token fee and for the wedding day only. Their packages tend to be more expensive and always includes a credit towards an album, compelling the bride to follow through and have an album designed and produced, since she has already paid for one, or at least the bear's share of the cost of an upgraded album. 
 
          Photographers who adopt this idea may also have only a single package, which includes all-day wedding coverage, an engagement session and an album. The thinking there is that "If you're going to do this, do it right." Of course the limited flexibility in their pricing may get them crossed off the list of many brides looking to customize their package. Not being one of these photographers 
myself, my speculation on the photographers reply would be "If you're not going to 'do it right' the way I think it should be done, then you and I are probably not a good fit as professional and client, and it's very important for me to work with people who are a good fit for the services I provide.”
 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the aricle in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) wedding photography packages https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-wedding-package Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:37:48 GMT
"What is the amount to reserve my date" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/reserve-my-date  

 

"What is the customary deposit to reserve a photographer for a date?  When is the balance typically due?"

          Most photographers require between 25-50% up front to reserve their services for your wedding date. Invariably, this sum will be nonrefundable. There are a finite number of working days for wedding professionals and we cannot afford for our clients to agree to hire us for their wedding day, reserve their wedding day for months, turning away other clients we then cannot accommodate, only to have the bride who booked us cancel her contract shortly before the wedding. Though we will not be performing our agreed upon duties in that case, it can cripple our business. The average photographer books 15-30 weddings per year, so each wedding day (and all the subsequent and preceding work that goes into each wedding) constitutes a significant percentage of our work year and yearly income. If your boss came up to you and said he was going to give you 10% of the year off, without pay, you wouldn't look at it as a holiday. It would be a suspension. In the same way, we have to protect ourselves from situations where, by no fault of our own, we would end up out of work. 
         
          Typically, the balance is due by the wedding day, or a week or more before the wedding. The full balance is usually due before the services are rendered to safeguard against the possibility that the bride will not pay promptly after the services are rendered, since, as I stated, the payment constitutes a considerable portion of our yearly income. A bride could be satisfied to be deadlocked with her photographer for any period of time after the wedding. Even if the photographer refused to turn over the photographs until paid, he (or she) is then on the bride's timetable and she would decide when business was concluded based on when she decided to pay. Luckily, I've never had a client who behaved this way and I hope my colleagues and I never do, but it's bad business to operate under the possibility of such a condition.

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the article in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Wedding photography deposit https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/reserve-my-date Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:37:43 GMT
"Why do photographers charge what they do???" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/photography-prices  

"Why is there such a large price range among different wedding photographers?"

       
  I'm tempted to go on a tirade on the concept of perceived value - something seeming better just because it's more expensive.  Because of this, marketing a brand name can be the difference between an excellent photographer thriving and starving irrespective of their talent level or professionalism. Everyday, it seems, the market is flooded with more and more "cut rate" photographers looking to provide some unknown level and quality of photography for a pittance. Experience is what they're lacking. Treading lightly here, I feel it's safe to assume that most people charging south of $1,000 can be assigned several characteristics: 
  • Photography, wedding or otherwise is not their full-time profession. It is better described as a hobby of theirs. As a bride or groom, ask yourself how much value (not money) you place on your wedding memories. Would you want someone who performes surgery as a hobby to operate on you? Do you want a "fire enthusiast" to come to the rescue if your home goes up in flames? I think two examples is enough. We have the word professional for a reason. Enough said. 
  • They are not charging enough money to allow for paying the taxes which they are responsible for, regardless of how seriously (or not) they take their work. They are not charging enough to allow for the days and weeks it would take to properly edit all the images, reformat and post them online, design an album and all the other things that happen behind the scenes, so it's safe to say those things aren't happening, certainly least not at a high level. If they are working in photography "on the side" it's likely that they only have an hour a day or even less to dedicate to their business and to their clients' needs, whereas a full time professional will tell you that their tasks are seemingly endless. Ask around enough and you'll hear plenty of stories about people who got a great deal and then waited 6 months to even see their pictures, if they were lucky enough to get them back at all.
  • For many other reasons, if someone is charging very low fees for their services, it can be a reflection that they are striving to be attractive by being the CHEAPEST photographer they can be rather than by being the BEST photographer they can be.
  • Lastly, the wedding market is huge, like any other, and there are always exceptions to the rule. If it were easy to find the best option for your wedding, there wouldn't be a thousand magazines and websites all offering guidance. There would be a big flashing sign or a trail of breadcrumbs leading you to your vendors. 
          On the other end of the spectrum you can always find another photographer that charges twice as much as the last. Normally, there is going to be a common thread between all the photographers you find that charge what seems to be an arm and possibly a leg (eg. as much as a decent used car). Their pictures are beautiful! They have rave reviews from their brides, their customer service is impeccable, they have experience for days, tens of thousands of dollars worth of gear to lug from event to event and a sharpshooter's ability to get technically sound and aesthetically pleasing images in any situation. Since they've priced themselves out of the general market, it's usually the case that they're catering to clients with large budgets and the entire wedding will be on par with the financial commitment they're willing to make with their photographer. 
         
          This is an entirely different type of client, and not only are they paying for beautiful photographs (which they could certainly get from any number of lower-priced competitors,) but they are also paying for pampering. These photographers must be prepared to go to the ends of the earth for their clients, reediting pictures endless times for tiny requested changes, meeting with the client multiple times for coffee to make sure details are ironed out and doing many other things that consume their time to the point that they are only able to shoot 10 weddings per year or less and therefore can't afford to do it at the same price as one who shoots 2-3 times as many. Within the realm of competent professionals who have reviews to reinforce their track record of excellent work, I believe it can be said the the photographs, of a $10,000 photographer are often no better than those of a $2,500 photographer, rather than 4x as good as their price would suggest to the uninitiated. Any full time photographer will tell you that the actual shooting is something like 10% of what they actually do. The other 90% of the time they're generating their own business and running their small business, often single-handedly. The difference in price is usually going to go towards the 90%, not the 10% that you see on the wedding day. 
         
          Any photographer can set their prices however they please. They decide the amount of money they'd like to make in a year and how many weddings they're prepared to photograph in order to hit that mark. YOUR job as a bride or groom is to look at their work, get a feel for their personality and professionalism, inspect their online reviews, take another look at their work and decide if YOU think that it is worth paying 1/25th of their yearly salary in order to get their undivided attention, ability, experience and artistic vision for the most special day of your life.  
 
 

 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the aricle in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Wedding Photographer prices https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/photography-prices Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:37:38 GMT
"When should I book a photographer? https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-when-to-book  

"At what point in the wedding planning process should a couple book a wedding photographer?"

 
           If a bride's wedding day is within the "good weather" window for the region she lives in (April-June and September-October in Alabama) then she needs to be aware that hundreds of brides in her area are all vying for their vendor of choice and these vendors will be booked at least 9-12 months in advance. If you want to have your choice of photographer, start looking at least a year before you get married and be prepared to make a decision in a month or so. If you plan to get married in the winter or the dead of summer heat, there's a chance your date will be less in demand and you can afford to wait longer, but luck favors the prepared.
 
 
 

 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the aricle in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) When to book a wedding photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-when-to-book Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:37:33 GMT
"What should I look for?" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-what-should-i-look-for  

"What should a couple look for in a wedding photographer?"

 

          I already touched on some of these points, but assuming a couple has already narrowed the field of possible photographer hires to those they can afford, the first and foremost thing they need to do is schedule consultations with those whose work they admire and whose style appeals to their own eye. Meeting with the photographer (usually for an hour or less) gives you an opportunity to get to know each other and find out if you are compatible in the most basic social ways. There will be photographers with loads of talent who you don't feel comfortable with and some that you feel immediately at ease around, just depending on your own personality. Happy people make happy pictures and if you're stressed out just by the presence of your photographer, then you're already off on the wrong foot. A primary component of a photographer's ability to manage the stress and tone of the day is his or her professionalism and behavior.
 
 
Brendon Pinola Photography 2013
Wedding Photography
 
 
 
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(Brendon Pinola Photography) What to look for in a wedding photographer? https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-what-should-i-look-for Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:37:28 GMT
"What to beware of" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-what-to-beware-of  

What should a couple beware of with certain wedding photographers?

         
          If you're planning an Indian wedding, beach wedding, destination wedding, or any wedding that differs from the traditional American wedding venue setting and chain of events, it is important to also have a checklist regarding these items and ask photographers if they have experience with the items in question. Of course the wedding timeline and any special circumstances should be discussed in any case. Aside from that, the couple should simply use their best judgment based on the criteria and characteristics of different wedding photographers, as discussed earlier. A good exercise would be to make the rounds with friends who have been married in the last few years. They will give you an honest impression of their wedding vendors based on their total experience, and if they hired a professional, they should have a full example of what that person's end product looks like. Of course, every photographer shows a "highlight reel" of the greatest shots they've ever captured on their website, so speaking with a third party can add invaluable objective insight.
 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the article in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) wedding photographer https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-what-to-beware-of Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:37:24 GMT
"How do I determine my photography budget?" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-how-do-i-determine-my-photography-budget  

"How should a couple determine their wedding photography budget?"


         
 
          This is an impossible question to pose since everyone's situation is different and some people simply don't have much of a budget. If a couple has been doing their due diligence in wedding research, they've probably come across numerous sources telling them "Cut corners and costs anywhere you can, but NOT on your photographer!" As a member of the object of that statement, I'm flattered, but everyone's budget has to be set with a ratio of what percentage will be spent on each thing. There's no sense in spending $3,000 of a $3,500 budget on your photographer if you can't pull the wedding together with the remainder. I do still agree with the statement, but I feel that more and more, as time progresses, it applied to a couple being judicious about the true quality and professionalism of their photographer and not being fooled by the first option that comes along that fits into their narrow budget. If your budget is $1,500 or less, there are certainly some options that are much better than others and, as I touched on, perceived value goes both ways. Some people raise their prices to hide the fact that their work is subpar and some brides with larger budgets may pass over excellent photographers simply because they charge less than what the maximum amount they can afford is. There's no guarantee that spending as much money as you possibly can assures that you've found your best option. Use Facebook and your friends to identify photographers who may fit into your budget either because they are earlier in their career than some or because they are willing to create a "skeleton" package that will fulfill your wedding day needs without added cost for things that can wait.
 
Bill Gates drives a Honda Accord! (allegedly)
 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the article in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Wedding photography budget wedding photography https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-how-do-i-determine-my-photography-budget Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:37:19 GMT
"What equipment should a wedding photographer have?" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-equipment  

"What equipment should a wedding photographer have?"

          I don't want to start a clinic for photographers here. (you can get that here) Many pros I know buy pretty much every updated iteration of the Canon or Nikon camera system that is released. Undoubtedly, they stay on the cutting edge of technology and can push their gear to greater limits to capture an image in extreme darkness or other difficult conditions. I know other pros that either feel that the top end gear they have (and replace every few years or so) does a perfectly good job without buying up every single new model before the old one has hardly gotten the plastic off the LCD. Others still feel that they shoot far too much and wear out their gear too often to use top level gear. They feel they can capture exceptional images regardless and use cheaper gear that is closer to being "disposable."
 
          I can't say that any of them are wrong but I do want to deflect some attention away from the equipment in general. A camera does not make a photographer any more than an oven makes a cook or a pen makes an author. Every shooter at any skill level is always, at some point, somewhere along a curve where they have to ask themselves if their ability level is limiting what their camera can do or if their camera is limiting what THEY are able to do. If you do your homework, photography equipment is clearly divided (by price, build quality and usually by the very model name) into Amateur, Serious-Enthusiast and Professional gear.  If you expect a true professional, then you should expect them to have gear that is not going to limit their ability. Aside from cameras and lenses, a good wedding photographer should be familiar with using flash, on and off their camera, as well as various modifiers that shape and control the light to suit their task. In order to handle all the possible situations that may arise, they need to have all these different tools at hand and in working order so shots will not be missed because the conditions were not optimal for available (natural) light-only photographs. EVERY photographer should make use of shooting in RAW format (another discussion) for the enormous benefits in the editing suite. Since RAW files are massive, your photographer should be prepared with enough memory card storage to shoot 1,000-3,000 images which, depending on the camera, can be 16-80GB. Personally, I bring 96GB to every wedding.
 
 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Wedding Photographer Equipment https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-equipment Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:37:09 GMT
"Do prices typically vary for an off-season or weekday weddings?" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-offpeak-prices  

"Do prices typically vary for an off-season or weekday weddings?"

          This is another topic that varies from shooter to shooter. Many feel that they work equally as hard on a Friday in December as they do on a Saturday afternoon in May and they see no reason to discount their services. They save no money by shooting off-peak weddings and anything they deduct from their price is simply money out of their pocket. Others are of the mind that if they already have booked the number of weddings that they're intending to book, picking up an unexpected wedding at a time when they would normally be slow is serendipitous and they are willing to make a little less money. Speaking for myself only, I already book and shoot as much work as I can possibly stand, and usually still book more weddings and shoot them, not wanting to turn anyone away. I am fortunate enough to be among the lucky few who literally would not take any job in the world over the one I have because I truly love what I do and I'm able to provide for my family in the process. I treat each bride as a case-by-case situation, as to whether I'm willing to accept one more wedding onto my plate that year, and, if I feel motivated to discount if price is a breaking point between us. I've certainly booked weddings before with couples that I felt I got along especially well with and looked forward to working with, or who were getting married at a venue that I had long wanted to shoot at. A couple simply needs to tactfully present their case to their potential photographer, and if they do not participate in discounts, that stance should be respected.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the aricle in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Off Peak prices Wedding Photography https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-offpeak-prices Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:36:58 GMT
"Can I get my photos in B&W?" https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-can-i-get-my-photos-in-b-w  

"Is it possible to get black and white as well as color photographs, or do couples typically have to 

decide between one or the other?"

          If your photographer is shooting RAW files, (and Heaven help you if he's not) they are recorded in full color. A correct workflow would predicate that they all be edited in color and then a batch of b&w images made later. Certainly, some images will translate much better in b&w than in colorbut, in my opinion, to give a bride no choice in the matter is to impose an improper level of personal opinion over what is aesthetically pleasing. Of course we are artists and our opinion matters but I feel that, in this matter, it should be up to the bride, so I always deliver every photograph in color and also in b&w. 
 

You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the article in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 

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(Brendon Pinola Photography) Wedding photos in B&W https://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2013/1/-can-i-get-my-photos-in-b-w Wed, 16 Jan 2013 23:36:48 GMT