Brendon Pinola Photography: Blog http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog en-us (C) Brendon Pinola Photography bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) Mon, 30 Mar 2015 16:19:00 GMT Mon, 30 Mar 2015 16:19:00 GMT http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/img/s/v-5/u772842317-o684033017-50.jpg Brendon Pinola Photography: Blog http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog 120 75 Lake Pontchatrain Wedding | Madisonville, LA http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/lake-pontchatrain-wedding-madisonville-la Lake Pontchatrain Wedding | Madisonville, LA

 

I reserve black and white conversions for a select few images, but something about this wedding conveyed alot of "texture" and little details that I think come through very powerfully in the simplicity of B&W. 
~BP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2015

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) Lake Pontchatrain Basin Maritime Museum http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/lake-pontchatrain-wedding-madisonville-la Mon, 30 Mar 2015 16:17:59 GMT
Equipment continued (lenses) http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/equipment-continued-lenses Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM

(click here for review) 

I love, love, love this lens and I can't see ever selling it. It's a prime lens, meaning that it has a single focal length, it doesn't zoom at all. This allows the lens to be designed with alot more simplicity than a zoom lens, which makes it smaller and lighter than zoom lenses AND allows it to  have a much wider aperture, making it great for low light and getting very shallow depth of field. It's unbearably sharp, it nails razor sharp focus more often than any other lens I own, and it's relatively lightweight for an L lens, as they normally incorporate heavy duty construction and aspherical glass elements.

On my full frame cameras, 70mm is "normal" or roughly the same view as the eye sees, neither zoomed in nor wide. So that being said, the 35mm is definitely a wide lens, but not ultra wide. It's a sweet spot for me and the perspective you get from shooting a little wider can really set your work apart, especially because to frame a shot you often have to physically move closer to your subject instead of just zoom in.

As with most of the other L lenses, it has counterparts both in the lower-end range of Canon lenses and from other companies. Canon makes $320$850 and $1,500 versions on this lens (The L of course being the most expensive) and they vary in build quality, focus accuracy, sharpness and other attributes..

Sigma also makes a 35mm f/1.4 that is rumored to be very sharp and possibly new competition for the Canon L, and it comes in $500 cheaper. I've found Sigma lenses to have the potential to be very sharp and usable in nearly any form of photography, but the build quality isn't up to the level of an L lens, and in my opinion you're more likely to get a copy of the lens that misses focus or has other problems. 

 

EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM IS

(click here for review)

This is a lens that EVERY photographer should at least aspire to have in their kit. Unless you get into shooting sports, it will probably be the most expensive lens you'll ever buy, but it is more than worth it. It has a constant maximum aperture of f/2.8, instead of an variable aperture that changes throughout the zoom range, and this is a world, nay a universe of difference from the cheap kit zooms you'll find bundled with cheap cameras at Best Buy. Most variable aperture zoom telephotos have a max aperture of f/5.6 or f/6.3 when zoomed all the  way in. A max aperture of f/2.8 is 233% (or 2 1/3 stops) brighter than f/6.3. If you're shooting in a dim reception hall, having to cut your light in half more than twice is going to make your variable aperture lens virtually useless.

Especially on a full frame camera, 70-200 is a fantastic focal range, from "normal" to a very nice portrait length. It has one of the heaviest-duty builds you'll even see in a lens and it's meant to last. It's famous for being very sharp, very accurate in terms of autofocus and it has all-around great image quality statistics.

Canon makes more versions on this lens than any other focal range (f/4L, f/4L ISf/2.8L, f/2.8L IS) but in my opinion, for a lens this crucial, you should wait until you can afford the Image Stabilization, which makes a big difference in how sharp your images stay, especially at slower shutter speeds. Nikon has their version which I've heard is also epic, and Sigma and Tamron each have their own offerings which deserve consideration since they are more affordable.

This lens is HEAVY because of all the glass and engineering technology that goes into making a lens that has a constant max aperture, is very sharp and durable, it adds up to...alot. Also, stick this big, sexy white beauty on your camera and you have INSTANT credibility :D While the 35mm is what I use most at weddings and other events, if I had to use a single lens for a portrait session it would be this one, hands down due to the flexibility of focal range, useability due to max aperture and stabilization and of course the outstanding image quality. Buy a good camera strap and get a chiropractor on speed dial. This thing is truely a millstone around the neck.

I also  sometimes carry at 1.4x teleconverter which multiplies the focal length of the lens out to 98-280mm. This comes at the cost of one full f-stop of light (the lens will not function wider than f/4). It's not a dramatic advantage in focal length, and there's also a slight drop in image quality with this attachment, so it's not something I use on a regular basis. If I had a consistent need for a fast lens longer than 200mm I would probably start shopping for a Sigma 120-300 f/2.8Canon 70-300 f/4-5.6L IS USM or Canon 100-400 f/4.5-5.6L IS USM

 

 

EF 50mm f/1.2L USM

(click here for review)

Alot of photographers would have listed the lens at the top of their list in terms of how much use it gets, and if they don't it's because it's still at the top of their wish list. It is an amazing lens. Another piece of advice that I give people who wanted to start exploring photography is to  go buy themselves a "nifty fifty." As usual, Canon offers an ultra affordable $125 version, a better quality and performance $400 version, and the $1500 mammerjammer "L". Personally, I used to own the $400 version and looking back I would have been just fine keeping that one instead of coughing up the extra grand for the L, but the L is of course an epic lens also.

50mm is a great focal length. On a full frame, it's slightly wider than the "normal" perspective, but still a very usable length for almost any situation. The wide max aperture (f/1.8, f/1.4 and f/1.2 respectively) allows low light use and a shallow depth of field for a creamy blurred out background or bokeh.

This L lens improves the speed and quietness of autofocusing noticeably from the lower versions and it's a very sharp lens. Some hold the opinion that the cheap f/1.8 version of the lens isn't really usable at apertures wider than f/2.2 or so, and the f/1.4 lens can be used at f/2 with acceptible results, whereas the f/1.2 can be used wider or (some think) even all the way open at f/1.2. It's a top choice for people who photograph kids as you need very fast autofocus to keep up with the random movements of children and the ability to grab a sharp shot in a split second.

On a "crop" body like a rebel or mid-grade body, the 50mil is about equivalent to 80mm, which is not a choice good for wide shots and groups of people, but is a very good range for portraits when combined with the wide aperture. Even if you can't see yourself ever paying $1,500 for the top of the line version, some version of the 50mil prime should be in your bag.

Sigma also makes a 50mm f/1.4 that owners claim is nearly as sharp as the L series and only slightly more expensive than the Canon mid-range. (Side-note, if you think I'm crazy for paying $1,500 for this in the first place, take a look at the $5,000 cinema lens Canon is now offering for videographers.

 

EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM

(click here for review)

In terms of image quality and awesome portraits, this lens is a beauty. In terms of size and weight, it's a beast. It's nearly as heavy as the huge 70-200 even though it's physically smaller and is, again, a prime lens with no zoom capability. Most portrait shooters that own it will call it  their favorite piece of glass and for good reason. It's a great length for flattering portraits (another link about portrait focal lengths), and on a crop sensor it equates to a 136mm f/1.2 which is even better if you don't mind the difference in image quality from the smaller image sensor. Unlike many prime lenses, the 85mil is totally usable and still beautifully sharp even all the way open at f/1.2. The ability to shoot a portrait and throw everything but a very small sliver of the subject out of focus is a powerful thing.

The reason that it ranks only 5th on my list is because for a big heavy lens like this to move around its focusing elements with enough precision to nail focus even down to within even a tiny fraction of an inch, it has be done relatively slowly. It's certainly no slouch (and for $2,200 it shouldn't be) but when shooting weddings, I find it's sometimes just slightly too slow for me to be able to grab a candid shot of a beautifull moment on the first try in the blink of an eye.

It's usually my choice for engagement and bridal sessions where I'm shooting portraits with the luxury of more time to compose and focus my shots, but during weddings it splits time with the 70-200mm depending on how fast paced the action is. Canon makes a dramatically cheaper 85mm f/1.8 USM that focuses as fast if not faster and is also very sharp for the price. Anyone but the most demanding photographer in terms of sharpness and smooth creamy bokeh would be happy with the $420 version, and of course would have $1,800 left in their pocket. That was actually the first prime lens I ever owned, and looking back I wish I never sold it.

***UPDATE 07.25.13 I recently sold my 85mm as I felt the $5,000 combined value between it and the 70-200 weren't justified by the total amount that I used them. I am planning on purchasing the Sigma 85mm 1.4 at some point though as it has very high scores on DxO mark...

Sigma 20mm f/1.8 EX

(click here for review)

I've had this lens for a long time and I still can't part with it. Coming in at "only" $629, its cheaper than most L lenses. The quality of the glass and the general engineering of the lens is inferior. It's not particular sharp at f/2.8 or wider, it has very noticeable vignetting and barrel  distortion, especially when used wide open and it doesn't control lens flare well at ALL when shooting towards the sun or other bright light source. The build quality isn't as good as Canons, and it doesn't even have a ultrasonic (or what Sigma calls Hypersonic) focusing motor, so focusing is relatively slow and noisy. Despite all these shortcomings, I have a special place in my heart / bag for this lens and wouldn't discourage anyone from at least trying one out.

If the price is too steep for a lens with these weaknesses, Sigma does make 24mm and 28mm versions that are a little cheaper, but if I went that route I'd probably go for the Canon 28mm f/1.8 as it's a very good lens for the price, and more compact than the Sigmas. (Canon also has new 24 & 28mm f/2.8 USM IS versions that are strangely high in price but have been getting very good reviews). The ultimate and most comparable contender in this category would of course be the Canon 24mm f/1.4L, but at $1,750, I haven't found enough need to add a fourth expensive prime lens that would be within a 61mm range with my 35, 50 and 85.  

Here are the reasons I haven't (as of yet) looked for a better performing super-wide option. There is no other 20mm lens from any manufacturer that opens up to f/1.8. Canon makes a 20mm f/2.8, but the performance at 2.8 isn't much better than the Sigma and the price is comparable, though the Canon does have USM autofocus. Next, the Sigma (like several other Sigma lenses) is designed to be able to achieve proper focus on an object even from a very short distance away. Sigma lists the minimum focusing distance at 7.9", which is very respectable, but take my word for it, it's actually more like 3-4". Using a super wide lens 4" from something provides a very unusual perspective. It's not flattering for portraits and creates noticeable distortion, but you can be very creative with these capabilities.

The other weaknesses are things that can be used in creative ways, but are not right for every shot, so I don't use the 20mm as often as I used to. Canon makes a variety of good wide options including the 24-105 f/4L, 24-70 (f/2.8L, f/4L ISf/2.8L II) and 24mm f/1.4L, but I don't think it will ever completely replace this lens. One of the newer Canon 24-70 lenses or possibly the newest version from Tamron are definitely on my wish list, and might be a reason to finally part with my Siggy 20mm

 

Canon 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro

(click here for review)

This is a lens you can do without until you build up a kit that will handle 99% of the shoots you'll be doing. Technically, at 100mm this lens should be good for portraits, and at f/2.8 you can get some good results, but even with USM af, this lens doesn't focus very quickly. This is because  the elements inside it have to travel a very long way to cover a range all the way from the very close ranges needed for macro work all the way out to infinity. It's also not a terribly bright lens and doesn't focus well in low light. However, it is a true macro, meaning that it can take shots at 1:1.

I don't use my macro very often at all. At weddings I really only use it for ring shots, and there are other methods and lenses that will work for up close detail shots like this, which is why I didn't spend $1,000+ on one of the L macros. It works very well for what it's specialty is, but not the best choice for much else.

 

 

 

Canon 15mm f/2.8 Fisheye

(click here for review)

Another specialty lens. On a full frame camera, the fisheye creates a full 180 degree angle of view with a ton of distortion for a wacky  perspective. Harnessing this intentional distortion is something that takes alot of practice, especially when there are people in the shot, as you don't want to warp a person's body too much or it quickly becomes an unattractive effect. Whether used to be comical or artistic, it's not something you want to do very often or the novelty of the unusual perspective will wear off in your work and you'll look like a one trick pony. I don't even necessarily use it at all on any given shoot. There are alot of fisheye lenses available, even attachments for other lenses, although I've found that true fisheye lenses can offer great sharpness and clarity, whereas the attachment lenses tend to have very poor optical performance. You can buy a fisheye without autofocus very inexpensively, but using one takes more time and trial and error to use since it can be very hard to tell if you have the shot in focus at such a wide angle. 

 

 

 

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You're welcome to reprint or repost this article on your website, blog or e-newsletter free of charge, provided that you don't change the article in any way and you include the byline "Authored by Brendon Pinola Photography" with the appropriate hyperlink to my website. In doing so you agree to indemnify Brendon Pinola Photography and it's directors, officers, employees and agents from and against all losses, claims, damages and liabilities that arise our of their use.

 

::about the author::

Brendon is a photographer in the Birmingham area, available worldwide for nearly any project or event. Visit his main website (linked below) to see his portfolio, resume, bio or to get in contact. Add this blog to your RSS feed and "like" his Facebook Fan page to receive fresh photos and content. 

Brendon Pinola Photography 2013

American Pictoralist  |  Storyteller

 
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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/equipment-continued-lenses Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:51:11 GMT
Equipment continued (Memory Cards) http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/equipment-continued-memory-cards Lexar Professional 1000x (150mb/sec) 16GB Memory cards

Buying good memory cards is becoming more important than ever before. Almost all pro level cameras use Compact Flash cards, but a few are starting to accept Secure Digital (SD) cards. They are not as durable, but they are cheaper and easier to find in a pinch. Cards get formatted so many times that they're pretty much bound to fail at one point or another.

Since the RAW files I shoot are much larger than common jpg files, I can only fit about 500 photos on a 16GB card (a little more when using the older MKII). I've heard that when using the 36mp Nikon D800 you can't even fit 500 files on a 32GB card! My full weddings range from 30-80GB total. I bring at least 96GB to every wedding so that even if one of my cards decides to give up the ghost, I'll never run out of card space. 

Also it's very important to pay attention to the speed of your memory cards. When you're shopping for cards you'll come across cards with the same amount of storage for a wide range of prices, and there's a reason. My RAW files are up to 40MB each, and my camera can take 6 of them per second, so up to 250MB of data per second can be flying onto my memory cards. The big bad 1Dx can shoot up to 14 frames per second! The cards of yesteryear were rated to write at around 15mb/sec. If you throw 250MB at them in one second, your camera is going to freeze up and will  not take any photos until the buffer empties and all the photos are written to the card. While we don't have memory cards available that will write fast enough to take that much data continuously, we do have cards that write at 150mb/sec, so that's what I use.

Some cards are rated differently, for example 133x 233x 400x 600x or 1000x. In my opinion, 400x (60mb/sec) is now the bare minimum if you're shooting RAW, and if you have a high resolution camera like the 5D MKIII or Nikon D800 you're going to want to go faster to avoid your camera bogging down. While you can buy cards as big as 256GB or still find them as small as 1-2GB, I find that 16GB is a good size because you don't have an entire wedding loaded onto a single card (so if you lose that card you lose the whole wedding) but you don't have to keep up with a dozen different cards if you were using 4GB. I normally bring four 16GB and one 32GB cards. I've gotten flawless performance from my Lexar 1000x   cards and I also have Kingston mid-grade cards that I recommend for those who cant' afford the big boys.

When it comes to transferring the images to my computer or laptop, speed is again a factor. When I used to use slow 15mb/sec cards, transferring a full wedding to disc could be a 2hr+ task. Now I use a USB 3.0 card reader, also from Lexar that allows incredibly fast transfer speeds, and I can empty a full 16gb card in less than 2 minutes. There are Firewire card readers that offer similar performance.

 

 

Now on to the lenses, the real heart of a good camera system. There's a saying that I love that says, "Amateurs talk about cameras, professionals talk about glass..." (The saying ends with "...Masters talk about light" but that's for another blog post). I talk to up-and-coming photographers on a regular basis and I always advise them that IF they are at a place where they're only going to be investing $500-1000 in upgrading from their "amateur" level camera kit instead of throwing down the full $20,000 for an entire pro level kit, INVEST in GLASS FIRST. Sure, a Rebel or low end Nikon or Sony doesn't have the cajones of a big pro body, but realistically, every camera on the market today is light years ahead of the cameras that true pros used only 10 years ago (minus the aspect of long term durability). Now, 10 years ago it took more talent and experience to get great images out of such relatively limited equipment, but all things being equal, the cameras we have now are pretty amazing.

All those comparisons aside, your camera is only a tool. I used to feel offended when someone would say "Wow, that's a great shot, you must have an awesome camera!" But now I just reply, "Yup! I taught it everything it knows!"

Even though cameras get outdated on a seemingly monthly basis, if you buy good lenses, you can keep them for a very long time with no problems. When I started in photography full time, I made the mistake of buying lenses as fast as I could, finding the cheapest version of a certain type of lens that I could, and I ended up finding the limitations of those lenses very quickly, selling them for a big loss, and spending alot more money on the lenses that I really wanted. For this reason, I also advise photogs looking to move up to do whatever they can to invest in gear that they know they won't have to replace soon. Generally speaking Canon's "L" series lenses are awesome,  but there are lenses from other brands that may have a place in your bag as well. I'll list my current lens lineup in order of which spend the most time on my camera.

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/equipment-continued-memory-cards Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:49:50 GMT
Equipment continued (cameras) http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/equipment-continued-cameras  

First off, I'm a Canon guy. Nothing at all against Nikon. If I could afford to own a full kit of both brands I would, but at the costs of lenses and keeping everything maintained and up to date that would just be rediculous. Both have stronger and weaker aspects, obviously neither is the clear superior. They even leapfrog each other periodically in certain aspects, which keeps the competition up to always improve. In fact, before the latest fleet of cameras from Canon were released I was thinking about switcing to Nikon, but thankfully, my new camera (read on) is (in my opinion) the finest camera for wedding photographers ever made. Your move Nikon. 

I buy all my equipment from B&H Photo. Although they have a zillion (Hebrew) holidays throughout the year that they are closed during, they generally have the largest selection, consistently good prices, and a healthy amount of reviews about most products.

EOS 5D Mark III 

(click here for review)

This is my main camera body. I love it!!! It's a 22.3 megapixel full frame camera. In this day and age, high resolution isn't as important for event photography as is the ability to quickly lock focus and get clean, crisp images in very low light. It has dual card slots, which is a great feature! With as many photos as I shoot, my memory cards get filled and emptied very often and this raises the possibilty of one failing. Having photos saved to two cards at once all but elliminates the possibility of losing a  critical photo in the middle of a wedding or other photo shoot. I also have the option to have one card serve as an "rollover card" so that if I happen to fill the main card at an inopportune moment I won't have to stop shooting.

The battery in the camera is rated to about 1,000 shots per charge, and I go way over that, so I have the battery grip that holds two batteries, plus gives you the ability to shoot vertical shots without using a different hand position since duplicate controls are on the side of the grip. I find this helps me keep vertical shots lined up better since I don't have to reach around awkwardly.

The MK3 has a very fast and accurate autofocus system and it works even in the very dim lighting situations that come up all the time during a wedding. It also maintains very clean images even at very high ISO so I don't have to sacrifice image quality for a properly exposed photo.

I shoot in RAW, and if you're a pro shooter, you absolutely have to. There's some shooters out there that insist that if you "get it in camera" in other words, use the best possible camera settings and/or lighting techniques, you don't need much further editing, but it's important to understand that the human eye is much much more capable than even the best camera sensor, and the amount of luminocity and tone that can be captured in a single photo is much lower than what we see with our naked eyes. Even if you take the "perfect shot" there is always something there that can be improved with editing, and shooting RAW gives you almost infinitely more flexibility in this regard. I won't explain the whole process, but think of it in these terms. If you had to write a song, would you want to pick 8 keys of a piano first and then write a whole song using only those keys, or would you just want to keep the whole piano? You probably will not end up needing all 88 keys, but having those extra 10 octave will open up so many more options for you.

I use full manual settings (M on the contol dial) 99.999% of the time. Even a top of the line camera like this isn't quite to the point that it can make decisions as well as I can with its Auto, "P for Professional" and priority modes..

 

EOS 5D Mark II

(click here for review)

EVERY professional photographer should have a backup camera. When you're shooting thousands of images at a time on a weekly basis, even a high end camera has a possibility of having its shutter break or some other error develop at any time. Furthermore, I don't believe that your backup camera should be the Rebel or whatever consumer grade camera you just upgraded from if you're new in the market. If your  camera goes out in the first hour of wedding coverage, your client doesn't deserve subpar photos because your backup gear couldn't stand up to the challenges of the wedding day.

My backup camera is the  5D Mark II (previously my primary body). Yes, it's a generation older than the MKIII, but tons of top end wedding pros still use this body and it's capable of brilliant image quality. I've shot many great weddings with my MKII and if my MKIII were to bite the dust, I'd be bummed, but I wouldn't be the least bit nervous about whether or not I could continue to deliver the quality of images my client hired me for.

I have the time signatures of my cameras synced together so that if I happen to use both bodies at once, or have to switch to the backup my photos will sort chronologically during editing without any problems.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/equipment-continued-cameras Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:48:26 GMT
The Battle House, Mobile, AL | Mariaya & Michael's Wedding http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/the-battle-house-mobile-al-mariaya-michaels-wedding

The Battle House, Mobile, AL | Mariaya & Michael's Wedding

 

Mariaya's wedding is one I will never forget, not just the day itself but the details surrounding it. She was married to Michael at the Battle House in downtown Mobile, AL on Christmas Eve 2012. It's almost a four hour drive from where I live to Mobile, so on top of the holiday becoming a long work day, I had 8 hours of additional time driving to get home at 3am Christmas morning. The natural thought would be, "why would anyone want to get married on Christmas Eve?" The day held special meaning for the couple and they had a history of celebrating it with family and intended to have, not necessarily a small wedding, but an intimate one with just their closest friends and family. It was certainly a cheery day and the closeness of the couple with their loved ones was visible and made it obvious that there was no where anyone would rather be. I especially remember that the food from the Marriott Renaissance-owned hotel was phenomenal. Thought the weather was sunny, it was quite cold and the entire wedding took place inside the hotel, and I made liberal use of one of my then-recent lighting purchase, a PCB Einstein strobe. It allowed me to add natural-looking beautiful lighting where the available electric and window lighting was "intimate" (see: dim). 

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) The battle house battle house wedding birmingham wedding photography mobile wedding photographer wedding at the battle house http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/the-battle-house-mobile-al-mariaya-michaels-wedding Wed, 11 Mar 2015 18:07:42 GMT
Stonebridge Farms Wedding | Brendon Pinola Photography http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/stonebridge-farms-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography

 

 

CAITLIN & TODD | STONEBRIDGE FARMS | CULLMAN, AL

Caitlin and Todd were married at Stonebridge Farms in Cullman, AL on February 28th, 2015. The weeks surrounding their weather brought the craziest weather you'd ever see in Alabama. We had 40° temperature swings. Seventy one day, almost a foot of snow the next. Cullman got some of the most snow only days before the wedding and the sun hadn't been sighted in weeks it seemed. That wasn't the end of the trouble, the families of the bride and groom had several last minute emergencies even spilling over into the wedding day itself, but you would never have known it talking to the bride. She was rock solid, and nature must respect that because on the wedding day the sun came out, the temperature came up to short-sleeves levels (shorts and flip-flops for me when I'm not at a wedding) and the snow started to melt. This of course left the ground soggy and muddy but even with that Caitlin insisted that she would not shy away from going outside in her beautiful gown and as her photographer at her beautiful venue, I salute her bravery. Through it all the day went smoothly and a great time was had by all.

Venue: Stonebridge Farms
DJ: My Event DJ
Ceremony music / vocals: Amber Hayes
Car service: Apollo limo
Catering: Stonebridge Farms
Cakes: Dreamcakes / Cupcakes: Edgar's Bakery
Flowers: Stonebridge Farms
Wedding Dress: Bella's Bridal
Bridesmaids Dresses: Bella's Bridal
Tuxes: Joseph A. Bank
Favors: Cupcakes - Edgar's Bakery / Cups - TheAmericanWedding
Decor: Stonebridge Farms (and mother of the bride )
Bridesmaid's Favors: Jewelry- BeYourselfJewerly on Etsy, Tumblers- Tervis

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham wedding photographer cullman weddings stonebridge farms weddings http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/stonebridge-farms-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Tue, 10 Mar 2015 11:53:40 GMT
Rucker Place Wedding | Brendon Pinola Photography http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/rucker-place-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Ashley and Freddie are a great match! During their consultation, engagement session and wedding they were beaming at each other non-stop and I never had to prompt a natural reaction between them. They were married at Historic Rucker Place in Birmingham's Southside.
 

Venue: Historic Rucker Place
DJ: Professor Beatz (O.Z. Hall)
Violinist: Susie Shortt
Car service: Sweet Glide Vintage Ride
Catering: Savoie Catering 
Cakes: Pastry Art Bake Shoppe
Flowers: LSL Event Design
Wedding Dress: Alfred Angelo
Bridesmaids Dresses: Alfred Angelo
Tuxes: Men's Wearhouse
Favors: Koozies by Christine Meahan Designs on Etsy
Decor: Jeannene Griesbach of Historic Rucker Place and Laure Friedman of LSL Event Design
Bridesmaid's Favors: Theresa Kochevar of 3 Stitches, LLC
 
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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham wedding photographer historic rucker place rucker place southside birmingham weddings southside wedding photography southside weddings http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/3/rucker-place-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Mon, 09 Mar 2015 13:28:00 GMT
Heather & Walter http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/2/heather-walter 013013Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL 024024Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL 038038Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL 049049Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL 067067Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL 071071Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL 080080Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL 100100Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL 110110Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL 113113Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL 118118Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL 121121Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL 127127Engagement session, downtown Birmingham, AL

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) Engagement photos in Birmingham http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2015/2/heather-walter Sun, 08 Feb 2015 22:48:41 GMT
Fountainview Mansion Wedding in Auburn | Brendon Pinola Photography http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/10/fountainview-mansion-wedding-in-auburn-brendon-pinola-photography Haley and Brett were married in their hometown of Auburn, AL at the fabulous Fountainview Mansion.

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Venue - Fountainview Mansion
Catering - Southern Hospitality
Cakes - Sonshine Cakes
Photography - Brendon Pinola Photography
Videography - SunDolphin Productions
Photobooth - Imago Photography
Ceremony Music - The Auburn Quartet
Reception DJ - DJ-OZZ
Officiate - Faulkner Law Dean / Minister Matt Vega
Coordinator - Invision Events - Wade Welch, Julie Bunkley
Hair Stylist - Rudy Maddox
Make-up - Amp Camp
Invitations - Auburn Awards & Fine Papers
Dresses & Accessories- Simply Elegant, J. Andrews Bridal & Formal
Tuxedos - Jos. A. Bank
Rehearsal Dinner - Saugahatchee Country Club
Guest Accomodations - Hampton Inn, Auburn Hotel & CC

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) auburn wedding photographer birmingham wedding photographer fountainview mansion fountainview weddings http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/10/fountainview-mansion-wedding-in-auburn-brendon-pinola-photography Mon, 13 Oct 2014 00:24:17 GMT
Bourbon Orleans Hotel Wedding | Birmingham Photographer http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/4/bourbon-orleans-hotel-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Christina and Jeff were married at the Bourbon Orleans Hotel in the French Quarter in March of 2014.

 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2014

 

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) Bourbon Orleans Wedding French Quarter wedding http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/4/bourbon-orleans-hotel-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Mon, 28 Apr 2014 00:47:28 GMT
The time I was almost a terrorist threat. http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/4/the-time-i-was-almost-a-terrorist-threat "Should I use my powers for good...or evil?"

Where ever two or more photographers are gathered, the conversation will inevitably gravitate to experiences we've had with would-be clients who we could not come to an understanding with on the topic of the price of our craft. Even though there are hundreds, thousands of photographers out there charging well over a thousand dollars a day for the images they create, I for one am still regularly inundated with folks who can't seem to grasp that the time, preparation, experience, vision, and many types of investments that a true professional has made enable them to deliver empirically superior results to those of an amatuer flying by the seat of their pants. Why is it that people seem to lump everyone with a camera into one category called "photographer?" This whole whirlwind of frustration descended upon me this morning in a completely new way that left me strangely encouraged, and yet....still bummed out. Read on...

My wife and I are in Boston (my hometown) for a few days. She has work during the day, so as is our tradition, I spend the day walking the city with a camera and tripod, looking for nothing in particular, but almost always finding something wicked awesome :-D. We were staying on Copley Square which is adjacent to the Prudential Tower (one of the two tallest buildings on the Boston skyline). We were here four years ago and I took some photos in the area and now that I have better equipment, better techniques etc, I wanted to take another crack at it. Near the hotel there is a massive reflecting pool. It's gorgeous, with a rolled marble border that acts as an infinity edge, the surface of the water gently tumbling over it. Next to the pool is the World headquarters of the Church of Christian Science. Their beliefs aside, their mother church building is very stunning, and it all adds up to a vista that you can't pass up. As I walked around the reflecting pool taking test shots and looking for the best angle for the composition I wanted, I noticed some security guards in yellow vests driving golf carts, and one seemed to be looking right at me as he reached for his 2-way radio. I wasn't alarmed. In cities since Sept 11th 2001 it seems like everyone imagines that they will be the one to catch the next Bin Laden that is plotting right under their noses.

I made my way to the far end of the pool and set up my tripod, mounted the camera and started dialing in my exposure settings. As I started shooting, a guy in a partially tucked-in white oxford with a messy armload of notebook papers walks up from the street. He seems to be very stressed out about something, sort of in a very big hurry, but not really going anywhere in particular. The fact that he looked a ton like Richard Kind was a real treat for me and I guess I gave him just enough of a sideways glance and smile that he immediately felt the need to explain his slightly disheveled appearance and darty movements. "I've got a job interview in a little while! Can you tell I'm not nervous at all about it?!" As he finished his sentence he seemed to decide to stop and chat awhile. He set his notebook and papers down on a bench right behind where I was standing. He turned around with another sentence forming on his lips, and the scene I was setting up to capture must have hit him all at once because he literally lost his breath for a second and then said, "WOW, man what a view, I'm gonna have to try out this new camera!" He fumbled in his pocket and came out with a massive smartphone and started fiddling with the cover trying to figure out which end you point and which you look at. At this point, I'm not even upset that he's unabashedly bogarting my photo, and I'm about to make some wisecrack about smartphones only being as smart as the operator when a huge gust of wind whips up off the Charles River and carries all his precious papers toward Huntington Avenue and certain destruction and his job interview along with them. He lets out a shriek and hustles after them in a panic. 

If you know me, you know I'm not above laughing at someone else's tragedy. If something's funny, it's funny, but I don't know this guy at all, some I'm holding back some chuckles as he keeps reaching down just to have the wind grab the papers again. One paper hadn't gone far, so I reached down and gently pinned it with my foot and then picked it up and waited for him to return. He finally did, out of breath, and promptly set the papers right down where they were before, and they promptly blew away again. "NOT AGAIN!" he bellowed and I finally laughed out loud. Surely he couldn't hold it against me, this is something out of a movie and my day is off to a great start.

As Spin City is putting his life back together, a stereotypical Vietnamese elderly couple shuffles up, the man with a big smile on his face like he found the fountain of youth. In his defense, he probably always looks that way. He positions his wife at the edge of the reflecting pool and then steps back a few feet and starts poking at the buttons on his Canon Rebel. It's so new that the red and black neck strap is still creased into neat loops from when it came folded and rubberbanded in the box. I'm about to turn back to my work before anything even stranger happens when I take one last glance back at Spin City and I see trouble coming.

The security guard who I saw from a distance has walked all the way around the pool towards me and he's brought a serious looking young woman with him. I've only got 3 seconds before they're close enough to start talking to whoever they came to talk to (I wonder) but in that time I have time to wonder, "did he go get her because she's his boss, or because she's better at confronting people? Or maybe she's better with a sidearm...."

"Excuse me sir," she said, in a not unfriendly tone, but still with a enough volume and annunciation to reinforce the official nature of her visit. Now that I think about it, I think she said said excuse me, with the "sir" but whatever, I'm not in Alabama anymore, you have to earn it up here. 

So let's pause real quick to review the scene. There's a bumbly guy with his smartphone and a bundle of scribblings of a reinvented wheel or something. There's me, and there's the Vietnamese couple. All of us with cameras pointed across the reflecting pool at the Christian Science center and Prudential tower. Three of us, or four for those keeping score, but it seems clear that the guards are approaching one of us. I feign confusion and look around as if to see who was going to respond, but my wry smile betrays me, so I look her in the eye and prepare to bust out my best Jason Bourne combat moves, or grab the camera and high-tail it like a scalded dog and see how good a charge the golf cart has. I decided to face the music and responded. "yes..?"

"Who are you with?"

"I'm with me."

"You're not with Channel 5 or something are you? You need permission to take pictures here." 

At this point the Vietnamese couple have vanished into thin air, strange considering that I can see a long way in every direction. Spin City seems to suddenly need to go to his interview and mutters something about being late. I call "good luck!" after him, hoping that if I act like he and I are friends on some level that it will lend credence that the Canon on my tripod is only for taking pictures, not for firing terrorist Canon-balls. Now we're alone, but her stance hasn't changed. Just then I notice now that she's closer that her yellow shirt says "Church of Christian Science" on it. Am I going to be hauled into the basement of that castle and tried as a heretic and dismembered??

"No I'm not working. I am a professional, but this is just for fun....personal use." Ah yes, the magical phrase, personal use. That makes it all better, right? Kinda like personal space? Personal preference? You can't argue when it's personal.

Surprisingly, her tone did change then. She seemed to already be turning away to walk away. "That's fine, we just have to make sure people aren't publishing or selling anything without authorization. Have a good day."

Ok for those who are still reading, you've probably noticed that my topic paragraph now seems completely disconnected from the story I just told. I admit, I just had to tell the beginning part because it was so funny to me, but in the end, do you see what I was getting at? The guards saw three cameras pointed at the same thing. They never had the first thought about the Rebel and the smartphone. Part of their job is to be on the lookout for photographers and they didn't confuse anyone me. The obvious reason that they moved to say something to me, or anyone else they feel is a genuine possibility of a problem for them and their organization is that they knew that the power of influence and effect of a professional photograph can be far-reaching. If someone is going to write a damaging article about Christian Science, or whatever they were afraid of, they don't send someone with a smart phone. So to bring things fully back around, the guards can easily tell the difference between an enthusiast amater and a pro. But when someone needs to hire a photographer and their money is involved, they immediately mentally bring everyone down to a very low level and attribute very little value or worth to what we do, even though they will still expect high quality results. 

This comes from a biased place, and I welcome comments on the topic, but there's a system ratio in my mind that applies to many things that people do for a living. Take a service like replacing an engine, preparing a meal, stitching up a cut on your forehead, bagging groceries, a car ride to the airport, whatever. (Or for the sake of this one-way discussion imagine that you need wedding photography services that cannot be replaced or re-shot, you have one chance to get it right) On a scale of 1-10, rate a service on how hard it would be for you yourself could personally take care of the need that that service addresses, and whether you would produce the exact same result as the paid professional. Keep in mind that depending on the service, if you aren't even capable of producing the desired results even with more time and more trial and error than you're willing to give a paid professional, you have to surrender a full 10 points to the service in this column.  Next, from 1-10 rate how inconvenient or time-consuming it would be for you to do this thing to the best of your ability. For the heck of it, rate how much of a problem it would be if this thing was NOT done properly. Lastly, from 1-10 rate how important it is to you that this thing be done in an excellent and profession manor, in a timely and convenient fashion and the end product must be very high quality. NOW, add those scores up for a number somewhere between 4 and 40, or at least take a stab at it. The higher the score, the higher the price will be, and for the reasons laid out in the score. If the service is cooking a hamburger, the score will probably be pretty low. If it's a world-class, kobe-beef gourmet burger, bump the score up.  If it's brain surgery, go ahead and max it out with all tens. If you care about photography and it's important that the pictures be excellent, there will be a high score. If you don't care about photography and you're not looking for anything better than what you can do with your smartphone or Rebel (and little or no experience), go ahead and give it a low score. If you think you can get a "40" photographer for a "4" price, you're essentially saying that you can do just as good a job as the photographer will, but you want him or her to deliver much better photos than you can take (stay with me here). It's not important that they do a professional job, but you want them to be excellent. It doesn't really matter what the end product looks like, but it better be awesome. Doesn't make alot of sense does it? Nope. You get what you pay for.  If you want something great, go shopping for great. If you expect to find great for the same price as "meh" you are devaluing the photographer and his or her craft, and in a backwards way asking them to willing participate in a robbery of themselves. 

 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2014

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) How did they know? photos of boston professional photographer http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/4/the-time-i-was-almost-a-terrorist-threat Thu, 24 Apr 2014 20:58:15 GMT
Burritt on the Mountain Wedding | Birmingham Photographer http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/4/burritt-on-the-mountain-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Cari and Parker held their March 2014 wedding at historic Burritt on the Mountain in Huntsville, AL. The stunning scenic view was the backdrop for their ceremony and spirits were high for the reception in the Baron Bluff reception hall.

 

Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL Wedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, ALWedding at Burritt on the Mountain, Huntsville, AL

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) Burritt on the mountain huntsville wedding http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/4/burritt-on-the-mountain-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Thu, 10 Apr 2014 21:54:35 GMT
Engagement Session in Old Town Helena http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/engagement-session-in-old-town-helena Old Town Helena, AL
 

Ashley grew up in Helena, AL, and though she and her fiance Gary live in Madison now, they called me out to Helena for their engagement session to bring their own personality to the session and make some new memories to go with the old. The weather was amazing for February and we got some very nice photos. Ashley's dog Gus even made a cameo!

 

Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos Old Town Helena, ALOld Town Helena, ALAshley & Gary (and Gus) meet with wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in Old Town Helena for their engagement photos © Brendon Pinola Photography 2014

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/engagement-session-in-old-town-helena Sun, 23 Feb 2014 16:41:09 GMT
Mountain View Ballroom | Birmingham Photographer http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/mountain-view-ballroom-brendon-pinola-photography Mountain View Ballroom and Gardens

 

Shauna and Alex were married at Mountain View Ballroom and Gardens in August of 2012. The threat of rain didn't phase them, though it did inspire a beautiful sunset shot featuring one of my photo umbrellas!

 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2014

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham wedding photographer mountainview ballroom photos mountainview ballroom weddings mountainview photos springville, al wedding http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/mountain-view-ballroom-brendon-pinola-photography Wed, 19 Feb 2014 02:12:49 GMT
I taught my camera everything it knows http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/i-taught-my-camera-everything-it-knows "Equipment is a tool, not a goal"

There's a saying that I LOVE that goes something like this: "Amateurs talk about cameras. Pros talk about glass (lenses). Masters talk about light." The gist of that saying is that as you get better in photography, you start to recognize the difference between a tool that helps you create a photograph and the actual ingredients of a great photo and you rely less on the camera and more on the part of the photo that comes from within yourself. An expensive camera is not a necessary ingredient to a great photo. Beautiful lighting is. A fancy zoom lens is not an ingredient. A beautiful moment of inspiration is.

All the time when I'm planning a session with an engaged couple or other client and we get to the part when we decide the time and place of the shoot, I almost always parrot this mantra: "I'll take good lighting over a beautiful location every time." Obviously I'd love to have both, but given a choice I'd rather have the proper ingredients to get the best result. 

Ok last little rant and then I have a little challenge for you

At weddings, one of the most frustrating moments is when someone, who it seems has been shopping around some camera gear or has an interest in photography and a decent camera walks up to me during a lull and starts drooling over the $6,000 of metal, glass and magnesium allow in my hands. When they finally find their powers of speech, the first syllables are usually something like "man that's a nice camera, I'll bet it takes awesome pictures!" It's so frustrating! Do they think that all I am is a pair of hands that has had a nice camera fall into them? I appreciate what my camera can do, but without knowing how to use it it can't do anything more than the cheapest camera you can find will do.

Well, to fight that sentiment and to show that you DON'T need to spend a ton of money on camera gear to make awesome photos, you just need to learn how to use and control light and master the functions of the camera you already have, I brought two cameras to a newborn session this afternoon, both to test out the one I recently bought, but also to hopefully demonstrate a point.

 

The first is my workhorse. A $3,500 Canon 5D Mark III full frame DSLR with a $2,400 24-70mm pro lens on it. It has a massive image sensor inside that gathers a ton of light, enabling it to take very VERY high quality photos even in low light. 

The second camera is my Canon G15 point-and-shoot camera. It's not even Canon's newest "G" model, there's actually 3 cameras in the "G" line that are better than this one, and I picked it up for $350 (90% cheaper than the Mark III) It has a fixed zoom lens and an image sensor that is the David to the Mark III's Goliath (see chart below, the G15 is comparable to the S90) It's a great little camera to have, mainly because I can't haul around the huge workhorse on a daily basis, but it definitely has serious limits, not to mention not having the same WOW factor :-)

 

 

 

 

 

I set both cameras to the same settings, ISO200 1/200th sec and f/2.8 and fired away at little Baby Hayes. Can you tell which camera made which photo? Leave your guess as a comment (no peeking ahead). I included close up crops for pixel-peepers so you can compare the sharpness.

The first photo are from the Mark III and the second is from the G15, but I was extremely pleased with the results from both! I'll admit, I was using some studio lighting that made it a little easier for the camera, but I found that the G15 was more than capable of producing great images and I'd be confident that I would not be overly handicapped if I was forced to use it in a pinch. 

 

If seeing this just frustrates you because you feel that you'll never understand how to use your camera no matter how good it is, just drop me a line from my website. I've trained dozens of photographers of all skill levels and I offer lessons that will definitely improve your photography and make it more enjoyable for you. 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2015

 

 

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) learn how to use your camera http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/i-taught-my-camera-everything-it-knows Thu, 13 Feb 2014 01:37:20 GMT
Birmingham Botanical Gardens | Birmingham Photographer http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/birmingham-botanical-gardens-brendon-pinola-photography Birmingham Botanical Gardens | Brendon Pinola Photography

 

Brittany had her Bridal portraits shot at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola in the Spring of 2013. 

 

 

© Brendon Pinola Photography 2014

www.brendonpinolaphotography.com

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) Bridal portraits birmingham botanical gardens birmingham wedding photographer http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/birmingham-botanical-gardens-brendon-pinola-photography Tue, 04 Feb 2014 22:05:46 GMT
Tuscaloosa / Northport engagement session | Birmingham Photographer http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/tuscaloosa-/-northport-engagement-session-brendon-pinola-photography Tuscaloosa / Northport Engagement Session | Brendon Pinola Photography

 

Joy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Stay tuned for another blog post of their wedding at Sixth Avenue Baptist Church in Birmingham and reception at the Cahaba Grand. Their wedding photos are being featured in Birmingham Weddings and Celebrations magazine in the Winter 2014 issue. So psyched!

 

Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. Tuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionTuscaloosa and Northport Engagement sessionJoy and Doug are UA grads and so they brought wedding photographer Brendon Pinola out to Tuscaloosa for their engagement session that was as glamorous as it was fun and touching. © Brendon Pinola Photography 2014

www.Brendonpinolaphotography.com

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) tuscaloosa photographer http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/tuscaloosa-/-northport-engagement-session-brendon-pinola-photography Sun, 02 Feb 2014 21:34:25 GMT
Engagement Session at Mathew's Manor | Birmingham Photographer http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/engagement-session-at-mathews-manor-brendon-pinola-photography Engagement Session at Mathew's Manor | Brendon Pinola Photography

Leslie and Matthew will be married at Mathew's Manor next month, but they were so taken with the beauty of the venue that we decided to take engagement photos there also while we still had some fall colors. I edited the photos with a tilt shift emulator, a cooling RGB curve and tone overlay a mild texture overlay for an overall fashion vibe. 

 

Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola Engagement session at Mathew's ManorEngagement session at Mathew's ManorLeslie and Matthew had the engagement photos taken at Mathew's Manor in Springville AL with Birmingham wedding photographer Brendon Pinola

 

 

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) Birmingham wedding photographer Mathew's Manor engagement session http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/2/engagement-session-at-mathews-manor-brendon-pinola-photography Sun, 02 Feb 2014 15:57:42 GMT
Post-bridals with the Beetle http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/1/post-bridals-with-the-beetle Birmingham wedding photography

Lauren and Adam called me out for some photos after their wedding and Adam brought his project car - a souped up VW Beetle Convertible. I love it when clients bring their own personality and interests into their photos.

 

Bridal Portraits with the VW BeetleBridal Portraits with the VW BeetleLauren's bridal portraits with Birmingham Wedding Photographer Brendon Pinola at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens Bridal Portraits with the VW BeetleBridal Portraits with the VW BeetleLauren's bridal portraits with Birmingham Wedding Photographer Brendon Pinola at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens Bridal Portraits with the VW BeetleBridal Portraits with the VW BeetleLauren's bridal portraits with Birmingham Wedding Photographer Brendon Pinola at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) birmingham wedding photograper bridal portraits http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/1/post-bridals-with-the-beetle Fri, 31 Jan 2014 11:49:58 GMT
Huntsville Museum of Art Wedding | Birmingham Photographer http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/1/huntsville-museum-of-art-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography The Huntsville Museum of Art was the site where Rob and Sarah celebrated in late 2012 after their wedding ceremony at St Mark's Lutheran Church. Rob and his army buddies kept the party going all night. They had their engagement session at various landmarks in Birmingham, AL and Sara had her bridal portraits shot at Big Springs Park in Huntsville.

 

Photography: Brendon Pinola Photography
Prep: Embassy Suites Hotel, Huntsville, AL
Ceremony: St Mark's Lutheran Church
Reception: Huntsville Museum of Art
Dress: Maggie Sottero
Shoes: Design Your Pedastal
Cakes
Rings:
DJ:
Invitations:
Flowers:

 

Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave Engagement session in Birmingham, ALBirmingham Botanical Gardens Sloss Furnace Morris Ave

 

Sarah's Bridal portraitsBig Springs Park, Huntsville AL Sarah's Bridal portraitsBig Springs Park, Huntsville AL Sarah's Bridal portraitsBig Springs Park, Huntsville AL Sarah's Bridal portraitsBig Springs Park, Huntsville AL

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bpinola@gmail.com (Brendon Pinola Photography) Birmingham Botanical Gardens Embassy Suites Huntsville Museum of Art Morris Ave, Birmingham AL Sloss Furnace http://www.brendonpinolaphotography.com/blog/2014/1/huntsville-museum-of-art-wedding-brendon-pinola-photography Fri, 24 Jan 2014 22:47:42 GMT